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S. AFRICAN PRESIDENT MEETS WITH ACTIVISTS
ADDITIONAL CONCESSIONS SOUGHT FOR BLACKS

SHARE S. AFRICAN PRESIDENT MEETS WITH ACTIVISTS
ADDITIONAL CONCESSIONS SOUGHT FOR BLACKS

Anti-apartheid activists met with President F.W. de Klerk Wednesday to discuss the imminent release of eight political prisoners and ask him to make more concessions to the black majority.

De Klerk met with Anglican Archbishop Desmond Tutu, the Rev. Allan Boesak and the Rev. Frank Chikane. The talks were the first de Klerk has held with militant black leaders since he took power in August.De Klerk's announced Tuesday that the government would free eight longtime prisoners, including seven leaders of the outlawed African National Congress. A prison official said the release would be within two weeks.

Anti-apartheid activists welcomed the announcement but called the move insufficent unless the government also frees African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela, legalizes banned organizations and lifts restrictions on many black leaders not in prison.

"What is the use of releasing them when we still have a state of emergency and when our organizations are still banned?" the Rev. Allan Boesak asked 4,000 people at a rally at the University of the Western Cape Tuesday night.

"Eight is not enough, with detainees and political prisoners, including Nelson Mandela, still being held hostage," said Boesak, president of the World Alliance of Reformed Churches.

The government has indicated Mandela may be released within the next few months.

State radio acknowledged in an editorial Wednesday that the prisoners have a constituency among South Africa's black majority and need to be part of negotiations.

"Where Walter Sisulu . . . and others are recognized by some communities in South Africa as their authentic leaders - and if they, too, subscribe to democratic and peaceful objectives - there is a need for them to be placed in a position where they can make a contribution to the debate on just how a future South Africa should look," Radio South Africa said.

Sisulu is the country's most respected black leader after Mandela.