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WIDOWER IS READY TO BE A TRAVELING MAN - BUT HE SHOULD BE AWARE OF THE RISKS

SHARE WIDOWER IS READY TO BE A TRAVELING MAN - BUT HE SHOULD BE AWARE OF THE RISKS

DEAR ABBY: I am in need of some information and help in finding a licensed escort service or companionship service for persons who have been widowed or are single for reasons of their own. I lost my wife of 39 years two years ago and am now to a point that I would like to get on with my life. I have a very small income and cannot do much traveling, although I would like to do so. Having just returned from my first ship cruise, which was very enjoyable, I realized that there are ladies out there who would pay for a companion for a short period of time. I am not interested in a long-term relationship at this time.

I am a 71-year-old male (look 60), non-smoker, social drinking OK, average physical condition. I consider myself a Christian and prefer a Christian lady. I would like to explore the possibilities of being an escort, and I think I should try to find an agency that specializes in this sort of thing because of the pitfalls that could be encountered. I would value highly any information you could give me. - CALIFORNIANDEAR CALIFORNIAN: I appreciate your desire to travel and see the world, but if you intend to do so by hiring yourself out as a paid escort, I hope you know how risky it is these days. I'm sure there may be some very decent people in that line of work - but there are also some kinky, kooky folks among their numbers.

However, if you're determined to become a hired escort, make yourself available for interviews with the escort services in your area. Another thought: Inquire at the travel agencies and cruise lines. And keep your fingers crossed.

DEAR ABBY: I am a 71-year-old woman. Recently, when I went for an eye appointment, the doctor's greeting to me was, "Hello, young lady!"

As I have stated, I am not a young lady and prefer not to be addressed condescendingly. What's wrong with, "Hello, Mrs. Jones?"

Along the same line, I went to a nursing home to talk business with the administrator who was in her early 30s. I was not in her office five minutes before she was calling me by my first name!

Since we were doing business and she was so much younger, she should have known that she owed me the courtesy and respect of addressing me as "Mrs. Jones."

What is your opinion? - "MRS. JONES" IN SAVANNAH, GA.

DEAR MRS. JONES: People who address strangers - particularly older strangers - by their first names (or anything other than "Mr." or "Mrs.") may be perceived as rude or disrespectful, but actually they are just trying to be friendly.

If such familiarity bothers you, simply request that strangers call you "Mrs. Jones."

DEAR ABBY: A 33-year-old woman died today. She was applying mascara when she missed a turn, her car hit a concrete curb and flipped over. She suffered skull and chest injuries, was on life support for two weeks and then died. With her was her young son, who suffered only a broken arm. She left four young children without a mother.

Abby, please print this to remind people who drive that driving requires their full attention. - A FRIEND OF A FRIEND

C) 1989 Universal Press Syndicate