Facebook Twitter

LOTS OF CANDIDATES TO CHOOSE FROM IN 5 CITY ELECTIONS

SHARE LOTS OF CANDIDATES TO CHOOSE FROM IN 5 CITY ELECTIONS

Voters going to the polls Tuesday in Davis County have large slates of candidates to pick from in the five cities holding primary elections for mayor and city council.

"I can't explain it," said one incumbent councilman facing a large field of challengers. "I don't know if they think we've done a lousy job and they can do it better or if things are running so smoothly they think it's an easy job and don't know how hard it is."The five cities holding primaries Tuesday are Bountiful, Clearfield, Farmington, Kaysville and Layton.

In Bountiful, voters will narrow the field in both the council and mayoral elections. Incumbent Mayor Dean S. Stahle has three challengers, George S. Burbridge, Bob Linnell, and David C. Piggott.

The main issue in that race is the city's economic-development polices and the redevelopment of the downtown business district.

Seven candidates are looking for ballot position in the November election for council seats. All are newcomers, with none of the incumbents seeking re-election.

The candidates are James Q. Anderson, Jeff A. Chretien, Renee J. Coon, Douglas R. Davis, Leslie T. Foy, Arnell Heaps and Roger R. Winslow.

Voters in Clearfield will cut the field of candidates for council in half, from eight to four, in Tuesday's primary. There is no primary for mayor.

Two incumbents, Rulon C. Cummings and James E. Hurst, face six challengers in the council primary: Leo W. Eastman II, E. Gene Fessler, Marc S. Kagan, Laren C. Livingston, Douglas K. Nelson, and Patricia G. Seach.

Issues of economics and taxation are foremost in the race, with the incumbents pointing to new businesses and improvements made in the city's commercial area and the challengers saying more needs to be done.

Farmington voters will eliminate one candidate out of the three running for mayor. With one candidate withdrawing from the race after he filed, no primary for the city's two council seats coming up in November is necessary.

Incumbent Mayor Robert W. Arbuckle is seeking a second term and is being challenged by Councilman Don White and resident Glenn R. Maughan.

Arbuckle is asking for another term to complete some of the projects the city has started and establish a five-year capital-improvements plan. White, who claims support in his bid from several current and former council members, said its time for new leadership.

Maughan, who has lived in the city for 2 1/2 years, said he's found general dissatisfaction with the city administration from fellow residents.

Kaysville has the largest slate of candidates, with eight seeking two four-year council seats and six looking to fill a two-year vacancy seat.

In the four-year race, incumbents Reed L. Adams and Kay Hansen, who was appointed to fill a vacant seat, are being challenged by Paul M. Belnap, Margaret Brough, Kevin H. Folkman, Joe Hill, Gary Madson, and Craig L. Taylor.

There is no incumbent for the two-year vacancy seat to fill the unexpired term of former Councilman Paul Wagaman, who resigned a year ago. Running are Floyd Baham, Cherie Goodliffe, Samuel P. Jeppson, Ed Little, Sam McAllister, and Douglas G. Stanger.

Most of the candidates cited concerns about increasing the city's tax base through commercial development but at the same time preserving Kaysville's small town, semirural lifestyle that attracted them to move there.

In Layton, five candidates have filed for mayor and six for two council seats. In both races, the incumbents are seeking re-election.

For mayor, incumbent Richard G. McKenzie is being challenged by James J. Layton, former councilman and Mayor Golden C. Sill, incumbent Councilman Kent Dee Smith, and former Councilman Donald D. Weaver.

Incumbent Councilmen Jerry Stevenson and Jerry Nebeker face challengers Ethel H. Adams, Brent J. Dotson, Lyndia Graham, and Terrence W. Luh.

In addition to economic issues, the candidates expressed concern for the city's transportation system, citing the lack of major east-west access roads. Issues of taxation and the way the current council proceeded with plans to build a new municipal and court building have also been raised in the city.