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NORWEGIAN STUDENTS AT U. COMBINE TREASURE HUNT WITH BLAST FROM PAST

SHARE NORWEGIAN STUDENTS AT U. COMBINE TREASURE HUNT WITH BLAST FROM PAST

Americans may think they know how to have fun - but they haven't seen anything like a Norwegian bash.

The parking lot at the University of Utah Stadium Saturday morning looked like a blast from the past, or maybe a pre-Halloween party. People decked in '50s fashion - poodle skirts, bobby socks and school sweaters - hung out by an old convertible, twisting to old-time rock 'n' roll favorites. In another corner of the lot, a group bearing a resemblance to big-time Chicago-style mob bosses could be found. Mingling in the crowd were nerds, rockers and, of course, some unidentifiable sorts.The event? An annual treasure hunt put on by the Association of Norwegian Students in America. This is the seventh year for the hunt, which, by the looks of things, is a huge success among Norwegians and Americans alike.

Bente Hovland, a U. of U. graduate who now attends graduate school in Arizona, said she came up especially for the event.

"It's great," she said and added that the wilder it gets, the better it is.

The treasure hunt, which consists of 10 clues, takes the hunters all over town. To obtain some clues, the treasure seekers must participate in contests and games. Other clues are obtained through bribery.

"One year we had to go to Temple Square and get a copy of the Book of Mormon in Norwegian," said Sirianne Holst, a business major at the U.

Holst said the final clue directs the hunters to a formal party, which begins at 7 p.m.

"Everyone usually knows where it is anyway," she said. "It wouldn't be much fun if no one showed up to it."

Holst said in past years, people have gone all out.

"Sometimes people will rent limos for the occasion," she said.

Even though the association sponsors the annual treasure hunt, Holst said anyone can participate.

"We have a lot of Americans that come," she said. "The more people, the better."