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UNCONTROLLED NEWS SPREADS IN HUNGARY
MEDIA CELEBRATE DAWN OF A NEW ERA

SHARE UNCONTROLLED NEWS SPREADS IN HUNGARY
MEDIA CELEBRATE DAWN OF A NEW ERA

Newspapers once severely controlled by the state carried extensive accounts Tuesday of the proclamation of a new republic and describing nationwide rallies observing the anniversary of the 1956 uprising.

"Hungary is a republic. A jubilant crowd listens to the historic announcement," proclaimed Nepsabadsag, the daily newspaper of the Hungarian Socialist Party, the successor of the old Communist Party that was dissolved three weeks ago.Hungarian television also carried footage never before aired of the 1956 Soviet invasion and the bitter fighting that followed Hungary's declaration of independence. Several magazines and newspapers also produced new, dramatic photographs of the events.

The television also carried an interview Monday night with Bela Kiraly, the commander of the National Guard and member of a circle of associates of former Prime Minister Imre Nagy, who was condemned to death for treason.

Kiraly, who now lives in the United States, said he hoped Hungarians will remain tolerant while the fledgling republic transforms itself into a Western-style democracy.

"I'm positive that Hungary is going to be a democracy, but you need tolerance and understanding," he said. "We don't have to have guns now."

Officials declared Hungary a republic Monday on the 33rd anniversary of the start of the pro-democracy uprising crushed by Soviet troops and tanks in two weeks of fierce fighting, with the loss of thousands of lives.

In contrast, the 1989 revolution was peaceful, spurred largely by the glasnost and perestroika reforms of Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev.

Last week, the Hungarian Parliament adopted a Western-style Constitution that guarantees free elections, a multiparty political system and guarantees of basic human rights.

It also abolished the Communist Party's private army and ordered it to return its vast assets to the state for distribution among the new political parties.