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RELAY AIMS AT GETTING UTAHNS TO VOTE `YES’ ON GAMES ISSUE
QUESTAR, KALL JOIN FORCES TO PROMOTE OLYMPIC FUNDING

SHARE RELAY AIMS AT GETTING UTAHNS TO VOTE `YES’ ON GAMES ISSUE
QUESTAR, KALL JOIN FORCES TO PROMOTE OLYMPIC FUNDING

Some will run. Others will walk. A few may even be riding horses and pogo sticks.

But they will be part of the Great Utah Olympic Torch Relay that will be held Nov. 1-4 to encourage Utahns to vote "yes" Nov. 7 on a proposal that will divert 1/32nd of the sales tax to build facilities for the 1998 Winter Olympics.Details of the torch relay, sponsored by Questar Corp., parent company of Mountain Fuel Supply Co., and KALL Radio, were announced to the board of governors of the Salt Lake Area Chamber of Commerce Tuesday morning and later during a news conference.

Curt Burnett, Questar vice president of public affairs, said the relay will begin Wednesday, Nov. 1, at 8 a.m. in the five corners of the state, which represents the five Olympic rings. A symbolic Olympic torch and a ring will be carried from the starting cities of Blanding, St. George-Kanab area, Dutch John, Garden City and Wendover through many communities and all of the state's 29 counties, covering more than 1,400 miles.

As the relay participants pass through communities, bands, public officials and other groups are scheduled to show their support for a favorable vote on the referendum.

Those carrying the torches and rings will converge at the City-County Building, then have a torch parade to the state Capitol for a final celebration and ceremonial lighting of the Olympic torch. The torch will remain lighted through the referendum, Burnett said.

In urging support for a favorable vote, R.D. Cash, Questar president and chairman, said, "The Olympics are far more than a sporting event and are a unique opportunity to showcase the state to the world and promote economic development, which is vital to our state's continued success."

"The Olympics also will help unify the state and demonstrate the spirit of cooperation that is one of our hallmarks. What better way for us as a state to enter the 21st century than to successfully host a prestigious international event," Cash said.

In addition to learning about the relay, the board of governors also heard from Mickey Gallivan, executive vice president of Harris & Love Advertising, about what is being done to promote a favorable vote Nov. 7.

Gallivan said the campaign has been much like promoting a bond election because of the low voter turnout predicted to be between 20 and 25 percent. He said a speakers bureau was established Sept. 1 and volunteers have been calling voters encouraging them to vote in favor of the referendum.

In the last few days of the campaign there will be radio spots featuring testimonials of people representing varied interests, a few television advertisements just before Nov. 7 and some newspaper advertising containing endorsements from businessmen.

In soliciting help from the chamber members, Gallivan said the most important selling point is the legacy the games will leave and the "bringing together of Utahns" in a common cause.

Cash said, "If we lose this vote it will set Utah back 20 years in economic development."