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PARENTS PROTEST HIGH SCHOOL BOUNDARIES
PLAN FOR NEW HUNTER HIGH FORCES STUDENTS WHO LIVE NEARBY TO ATTEND CYPRUS

SHARE PARENTS PROTEST HIGH SCHOOL BOUNDARIES
PLAN FOR NEW HUNTER HIGH FORCES STUDENTS WHO LIVE NEARBY TO ATTEND CYPRUS

Parents whose children, under a boundary proposal, would not attend the high school opening in the Granite School District next year even though they live nearby pleaded with school board members Tuesday night not to divide their community.

The Granite School Board took no action on the boundary proposal for the new Hunter High School, 5200 S. 5600 West, presented by a citizens advisory committee at Tuesday's meeting.However, School Board President Lynn Davidson said the boundaries will be set at the board's next meeting, scheduled for 7 p.m. Oct. 24 in the Granite School District board room.

The board heard more than an hour of testimony from parents and even a student who are unhappy that the proposed boundaries exclude some students living within walking distance of the new high school.

But West Valley City Councilman Gearld Wright, who was chairman of the citizens advisory committee, said more than 2,000 students live within a two-mile radius of Hunter High School.

"That's too many," Wright told the crowd assembled in the Granite High School auditorium. "We feel like we have done everything we can to make this fair and equitable."

The proposed boundaries are roughly between 7200 West from the canal above 4100 South to 5400 South; 5400 South to 5600 West; 5600 West to 4700 South; 4700 South to 4400 West; 4400 West to 2100 South; 2100 South to 5600 West; 5600 West to 3500 South, and 3500 South to the canal.

The most controversial area is the jagged connection between 3500 South and 6400 West and the canal at 7200 West. Parent after parent from that area asked the school board not to send their children to Cyprus High School in Magna.

Dorothy Jensen, a member of the Orchard Elementary School PTA board, reminded district officials that parents in the excluded area helped pass the 1983 bond issue needed to build Hunter High School.

"We were asked to support the bond issue because we would benefit from the new school," Jensen said. "There is really no reason why expectations raised six years ago cannot be met."

Other parents were more emotional. Donna Day Perry said her son often misses Cyprus High School activities because the family cannot afford to drive him, and buses to after-school events are not available.

Perry said West Valley City students at Cyprus are looked down upon by Magna students. "We're the people on the other side of 72nd," she said, "not part of Magna."

Debra Gull echoed Perry's sentiments. "We are not a high-income area. But we are family people," Gull said, adding that many parents who don't have a lot of money to spend on their children donate time to the schools instead.