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BANGERTER VOWS TO BOOST AGRICULTURE
GOVERNOR SAYS STATE BUDGET WON’T MEET THIRD OF THE REQUESTED INCREASES

SHARE BANGERTER VOWS TO BOOST AGRICULTURE
GOVERNOR SAYS STATE BUDGET WON’T MEET THIRD OF THE REQUESTED INCREASES

Gov. Norm Bangerter Thursday told Utah cattlemen and woolgrowers he is their friend and he will do all he can to help them build a more profitable agricultural industry in Utah.

Speaking at a joint luncheon of the Utah Cattlemen's Association and the Utah Wool Growers during both groups' annual conventions at the Marriott Hotel, Bangerter said "there is no group closer to the basic ideals upon which America was founded than people in agriculture."He said recent developments in Eastern Europe point out how much people around the world want the freedoms and the lifestyles that Americans enjoy. "It only signals that it's time we begin to take a good look at ourselves to make sure that we are worth emulating."

Bangerter criticized the U.S. government for spending too much, for maintaining too big a deficit and for being too soft on trade with other nations.

"We need to reassess our situations in government and privately. After all, the real strength of our nation is our individual families and the strength of our individual characters. We must all be law abiding."

The governor said he has been spending most of his time the past two months working on a new budget and said his budget "won't meet one-third of the increases that have been requested.

"Public education seems to be especially demanding. They are asking for more of the surplus money than there is surplus. I intend to do everything I can for public education because our children deserve it, but I can't print new money."

He held out little hope that teachers would get much of a raise or that any of Utah's state employees would be getting big raises soon. He said he wants to keep government employees' salaries as close to the level of private industry as possible.

"It is more difficult to assess what teachers should be paid since we can't use the private sector as an indicator.

"Utah teachers are making about 87 percent of the national average pay for teachers. Utahns on the whole are making 86 percent of what people on a national average are getting.

"I don't think we are out of balance. I don't think we can take the teachers up to the national average pay. Our classes are the biggest in the nation, but that hasn't changed in 20 years."

Looking over the past year, Bangerter told the cattle producers and wool growers the Utah economy in 1989 will create about 31,00 jobs - "the best performance since 1985."

"As a result, our unemployment rate has fallen to 3.8 percent, well below the national unemployment rate of 5.3 percent.

Bangerter said Utah's farm income has improved over the past few years, also. "In 1985, farm income fell to $93 million, a drop of more than 16 percent. In 1986, farm income rebounded to $144 million. In 1987, farm income jumped 26 percent - to $182 million.

"In 1988, farm income grew to $192 million and I believe Utah's farm income this year will be close to that figure."