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W. JORDAN FINANCES IN GOOD CONDITION

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West Jordan is in good financial condition, according to the latest annual financial report accepted by the City Council this week.

The financial report contained an audit of the city's funds and accounts finding no apparent material weaknesses, said David Sanderson, West Jordan director of Finance and Management Services.In spite of the good news, Sanderson indicated all cities in the state are struggling with revenue problems and West Jordan is among communities with an increasing population.

But Sanderson said the report revealed the city's outlook has substantially improved during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1989. The progress, Sanderson said, followed years of slower economic growth due to a decline in the manufacturing business.

Sanderson indicated West Jordan received, for the seventh consecutive year, a Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting from the Government Finance Officers Association.

City officials said they received the award because they published a readable and organized report. They also said West Jordan has recently been named Utah's fastest growing city. "This growth has a positive effect on employment," he said.

The report found only two accounts in deficit. Sanderson said the West Jordan Police Department budget was over-expended because of a contract city officials signed to provide security services to a Soviet complex. He also said the Class C road budget, which takes care of arterial city roads, was over-expended.

The city had estimated it would spend $1,941,153 on the police department but spent $2,086,950, a difference of $145,797. Also the original budget amount for Class C roads was $185,605 and the actual expenses were $393,163.

The city's fund balance increased by 62 percent in 1989, Sanderson said. The $226,086 increase provides the city with a fund balance equivalent to 15 working days of expenditures.

Finally, Sanderson indicated the report identified some programs needed to meet citizens' needs, including a communication system to help police and emergency services and the provision of security protection to Russian inspectors in West Jordan.