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TAD IS PRAISED FOR QUICK ACTION IN CORRECTING HEALTH INFRACTIONS

SHARE TAD IS PRAISED FOR QUICK ACTION IN CORRECTING HEALTH INFRACTIONS

Tooele Army Depot has already corrected 32 of the 40 health violations that the state charged it with last month - winning praise from state administrators for its quick cooperation.

Army documents prepared in response to a request by Rep. Larry J. Hopkins, R-Ken., said 21 of the violations were corrected before the Army was even formally charged by the State Health Department on Nov. 22; 11 more were corrected by Dec. 4; and eight are still unresolved.Hopkins requested information about the Army's actions, in part because he worried how 12 of the violations specifically dealing with operations of a pilot plant to destroy chemical arms might affect plans for a similar plant in Kentucky.

Dennis Downs, director of the state Health Department's Solid and Hazardous Waste Division, confirmed that the Army has quickly solved many of the problems, which he said "dealt more with records and bookkeeping problems than actual physical problems."

Among the problems resolved were: failure to conduct numerous required inspections and to monitor emissions control equipment at the chemical arms destruction plant; storage and transportation of hazardous wastes without permits; and receiving hazardous wastes from out of state without proper permits.

Among the issues that remain to be resolved to the state's satisfaction are:

-Training personnel within six months of their assignment at the chemical arms destruction plant.

-Storage of some hazardous wastes without permits, and failure to obtain detailed analyses of some materials stored in drums.

-Transportation of hazardous materials between Tooele's north and south areas, which are 15 miles apart, without manifests.

-Transportation of wastes to facilities lacking proper storage approval.

-Treatment of waste without a permit.

Rep. Jim Hansen, R-Utah, a member of the House Armed Forces Committee's panel on environmental restoration, is pleased with the Army's quick response, according to his press secretary, Rick Guldan.

Guldan said Hansen also has full faith that the Army will act quickly to resolve remaining problems at the depot.