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DAD AND SON ACHIEVE DREAM - A DUTCH BAKERY IN OREM

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Dean Cram did it all for cookies.

He invested more than $100,000 in business trips, marketing and equipment to make them.He entered a partnership with his father and hired six people using federal funds in a city program.

Cram experimented with many tasty formulas, only to find many had problems with either ingredients or machinery.

Such is the nature of the entrepreneurial itch. You take the good times with the bad times, and you can never really escape from the business. "It's kind of like getting married," Cram says.

Ever since returning from a mission in Holland for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints about 10 years ago, Cram had it in the back of his mind to produce a Dutch waffle cookie for Americans.

So after he had achieved his life-long dream of becoming a pilot, (Cram works for SkyWest) he decided it was time to pursue another dream - making the Dutch cookies.

The cookies, which he calls Waffle Delights, are cookies baked in small waffle irons, then sliced in half. A caramel-tasting syrup is poured between the two halves before the cookie is put together again.

Doyle Cram, Dean's father, says the cookies are as popular in Holland as doughnuts are in the United States.

The company finally has got off the ground, and with the help of six employees and some fancy Dutch machinery, it is making more than 1,000 cookies per hour.

Neither of the Crams had any bakery or marketing experience before they began. They learned the hard way. Doyle is a machinist by trade.

After traveling to the Netherlands to learn how bakers make the cookies there, he found that American flour differed from Dutch flour.

So he approached American suppliers to find the best facsimiles and experimented with the mixture by trial and error.

For a while, Cram made cookies by hand in St. George, but he needed to mechanize to mass produce. He went to Holland, and, with $35,000 from Orem's federally subsidized Revolving Loan Fund, he purchased the machinery.

Then Cram discovered that his recipes didn't work efficiently in the machinery, so more fine-tuning was needed.

Cram has marketed his cookies to airlines, which sometimes sell specialty items, and to Utah stores.