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REBELS KEEP FIGHTING, TRAP HUNDREDS IN HOTELS, HOMES
22 BUILDINGS IN PHILIPPINE FINANCE DISTRICT UNDER SIEGE

SHARE REBELS KEEP FIGHTING, TRAP HUNDREDS IN HOTELS, HOMES
22 BUILDINGS IN PHILIPPINE FINANCE DISTRICT UNDER SIEGE

Rebel soldiers positioned in hotels and high-rises fired on government troops in the Makati financial district Monday, refusing to end a 4-day-old mutiny and trapping hundreds of people in homes and hotel rooms.

Two bombs exploded in the city, injuring two people. It was unclear if they were related to the coup attempt, which began Friday and has killed at least 70 people.Hundreds of Americans and other foreigners were pinned down in homes and hotels in the post Makati district, where forces loyal to President Corazon Aquino contained the mutineers to 22 buildings.

Rebels shot at anyone venturing outside.

"Literally, we're in the middle," said Barbara Julich, a New York businesswoman trapped in the Intercontinental Hotel. "(We're) now low on food. There are babies in the building, and there is no baby food, and the mothers are hysterical.

"We saw were a group of nuns trying to walk where the tanks are. They were eventually shot at and took cover."

At least three people were reported slain in Makati Monday and 15 wounded, including one American, by rebel snipers and in fighting between rebel and loyalist forces.

Earlier, spokesmen for the Makati Medical Center said 10 people were killed. They said the discrepancy was due to an error in records.

Government troops forced the surrender of more than 600 rebels Sunday, and Defense Secretary Fidel Ramos said the coup attempt had been crushed but that it would take several days to complete "mopping up operations."

Insurgents seized Makati on Saturday, trading fire with government troops and sending bystanders racing for cover. Government forces appeared reluctant to attack for fear of killing foreigners.

U.S. Embassy spokesman Jerry Huchel said about 215 Americans were believed trapped in three hotels in the wealthy district. An undetermined number of others were believed trapped in luxury apartments.

"You cannot get help from the U.S.," said Julich. "You call our embassy and what we get is: `There are too many of you, we cannot help.' "

Hospital sources identified the American wounded as Jerome Weissburg, who they said was hit in the arm by glass when a bullet shattered the window of his room at the Peninsula Hotel. They did not know his hometown.

At least 70 people have been killed and more than 500 wounded since mutineers seized several military installations and bombed the presidential palace Friday, according to the Red Cross.

U.S. F-4 Phantom jets flew air cover for counterattacking loyalist forces later that day.

On Sunday, loyalist troops fought off a furious attack by the rebels on the military headquarters at Camp Aguinaldo, and about 600 mutineers surrendered.

About 400 rebels were still occupying Mactan Air Base in Cebu, 350 miles south of Manila. Their leader refused to give up and threatened to blow up the base's planes.

Officials arrested one coup participant who approached the defense chief with a grenade during a news conference.

Also Monday, an explosion occurred in the compound of the Central Bank, the equivalent of the Federal Reserve. There were no injuries.

A second bomb went off in the Ermita entertainment district, damaging an unoccupied minibus and shattering windows. Two women were injured by flying glass.

In the morning, the estimated 390 rebel holdouts in Makati - members of the army's First Scout Ranger Regiment - refused appeals to surrender and fired at soldiers and civilians who approached their strongholds.

The mutinous soldiers claim Aquino, swept to power in a 1986 military-civilian uprising that ousted President Ferdinand Marcos, has failed to deal effectively with the country's Communist insurgency and economic woes.