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DAYNA COMMUNICATIONS NAMES PRESIDENT
UTAH NATIVE FULFILLS GOALS OF RETURNING HOME, BECOMING PART OF MICROCOMPUTER INDUSTRY

SHARE DAYNA COMMUNICATIONS NAMES PRESIDENT
UTAH NATIVE FULFILLS GOALS OF RETURNING HOME, BECOMING PART OF MICROCOMPUTER INDUSTRY

Dayna Communications Inc. has announced the appointment of Boyd T. Jones as president and chief executive officer.

Jones joins Dayna after 26 years with Control Data Corp. He opened the Salt Lake office of CDC in 1963."With 26 years of management experience in the computer industry, Boyd has the maturity and skills that Dayna needs to manage the company through a period of expanding markets and rapid growth," said Bob Young, chairman of the board.

In becoming president and CEO, Jones assumes responsibilities held by Young for the past year.

Jones is a native of Utah. He graduated from Utah State University in 1954 with a bachelor's in mathematics and went on to receive a master's in statistics from Stanford University in 1960.

In 1965, Jones moved to the northern California Bay area where he served as district sales manager for CDC and then Western regional manager for five years. He was appointed vice president in 1973 and moved to corporate headquarters in Minneapolis. For the past 10 years, he has served as president of the Government Systems Group, one of five major groups within CDC, with revenues of over $365 million.

"In coming to Dayna, I'm fulfilling two long-held ambitions," Jones said. "I've always intended to return to Utah, and I've wanted to be part of the rapidly growing microcomputer industry.

"Within CDC, I was a strong advocate of microcomputing. In fact, I think I can claim to be the person who brought the Macintosh into CDC. The future is in microcomputers and networking. And Dayna, with its innovative, leading-edge technology and its commitment to top-quality, easy-to-use products, is poised to be a major player in that market."

Dayna Communications is a privately held company that designs and manufactures a range of products to meet the connectivity needs of personal computers.