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RESIDENTS OF 7 EC NATIONS VOTING FOR NEW PARLIAMENT

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Citizens of seven European Community nations go to the polls Sunday in the final round of voting for a new European Parliament, expected to be dominated by a Socialist bloc.

Turnout was low during the first round Thursday as voters in Britain, Ireland, Spain, The Netherlands and Denmark trickled to the polls, reflecting a general indifference to the 518-seat European Parliament in Strasbourg, France.Straw polls indicated an average 50 percent turnout, ranging from 35 percent in Britain to 75 percent in Ireland.

Residents of Luxembourg, Greece, France, Italy, West Germany, Belgium and Portugal vote Sunday.

Officials said the results of the election will not be announced until the voting is over late Sunday, but surveys show the Socialists, the largest single group in the past parliament elected in 1984, would likely make further gains.

Polls suggest that many Europeans feel the Parliament has little influence on their lives, has little authority and few well-known names.

But the Parliament's role is becoming more important as Europe moves toward becoming a market without frontiers in 1992. Already it has used its limited powers to modify important legislation, including pushing for stricter environmental controls and technical standards consistent across Europe.

In the outgoing Parliament elected in 1984, Socialists hold the largest number of seats, 166 against 112 Christian Democrats. Conservatives are the next largest bloc with 66 seats. The Communists have 48, Liberals 45, the European Democrats 30.

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Irish survivor

Charles Haughey, the great survivor of Irish politics, said Saturday he intends to be prime minister again despite an embarrassing setback in national elections. Late returns from Thursday's voting indicated that Haughey's Fianna Fail party would return to the parliament, known as the Dail, with fewer seats.

Haughey said he did not intend to resign as leader of the Fianna Fail party. "We will form a government," he said. With a half-dozen seats short of a majority, Haughey must find support among the opposition before June 26.