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POLES PLAN ROUND OF VOTING JUNE 18 TO FILL 33 VACANCIES

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A new round of elections is scheduled June 18 for 33 lower house seats left open after voters rejected the Communist leaders who were the sole candidates.

Holding the new elections could smooth over the delicate situation that resulted from the opposition Solidarity movement's victory in the voting on Sunday for the current lower house, the Sejm, and a new Senate.Solidarity union leader Lech Walesa met with government officials to work out a solution, and the two sides agreed to hold the new elections to fill 33 of the 35 seats reserved for Communist Party-backed candidates. The Communists took a majority vote for only two seats.

Politburo member Janusz Reykowski said the elections would be held a week from Sunday. He made the announcement late Thursday, hours after official election returns showed the breadth of Solidarity's victory in Poland's most open balloting in 42 years.

In the voting for the new 100-seat Senate, Solidarity won 92 seats, and the other eight were undecided. All seats in that chamber were openly contested by opposition and Communist-backed candidates.

Independent candidates were also allowed to run for 161 seats in the 460-seat Sejm and won 160 of them. One will be decided in a runoff.

Of the remaining 299 seats in the Sejm, 264 were contested among candidates from the Communist coalition. Because of the large number of candidates, only three seats were won outright and the other 261 will be filled in the runoffs, also June 18.

Reykowski said it was not known yet who would run for the seats.

In his first comments since the balloting, Polish leader Gen. Wojciech Jaruzelski was quoted as saying the party would be willing to give up power completely if it loses the next elections in 1993, which he said should be completely free.

This year's election limited how many seats Solidarity could seek.

"I would like to see totally free elections because I think a state of political solutions and social relations would make them possible," the British daily The Independent quoted him as saying.