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JUDGING THE LAWMAKERS: FACELESS? RE-ELECTION USUALLY COMES EASILY EVEN TO THE UNPOPULAR.

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Utah's legislators are, in a way, a faceless lot. Few Utahns can name their state representative or senator, although legislators seem to win re-election fairly easily.

Still, when you don't know a politician, you probably don't feel comfortable with him.

Utah's legislators are, in a way, a faceless lot. Few Utahns can name their state representative or senator, although legislators seem to win re-election fairly easily.

Still, when you don't know a politician, you probably don't feel comfortable with him.

The latest Deseret News/KSL-TV poll shows that nearly half of all Utahns would like to see someone other than their incumbent legislators go to the State Capitol next year.

But nearly half also say they'll be voting for Republican lawmakers come November, pollster Dan Jones & Associates found.

Since Republicans hold healthy majorities in the House and Senate, and since few GOP incumbents are defeated by rival Republicans in renomination battles, most likely even those citizens who'd like to see someone else in office will end up voting for their incumbent Republican legislator.

Jones asked 605 Utahns if, based on their lawmakers' recent performance in the 1990 Legislature, they'll vote for their incumbent senator and representative this year.

Forty-seven percent said no, they'll vote for someone new. Thirty-two percent said they will vote for their incumbent and 21 percent don't know.

Asked if they're inclined to vote for a Republican or Democrat in legislative races this year, 46 percent said they'll be voting Republican, 26 percent said Democratic, 18 percent said they'll be voting for the person they like regardless of party and 10 percent didn't know, Jones found.

All 75 members of the House are up for election this year. They serve two-year terms. Fifteen of the 29 senators are up for election. They serve four-year, staggered terms with half the body up for election every two years.

The fact that only 26 percent of Utahns say they're voting for Democratic lawmakers isn't good news for Democratic Party officials, of course.

Democrats are 11 seats short of taking control in the House.

They are a significant minority in the state Senate, holding only seven of 29 seats.