Facebook Twitter

FUTURE OF KAYSVILLE HOUSE UNCERTAIN

SHARE FUTURE OF KAYSVILLE HOUSE UNCERTAIN

The old home in the center of town that has housed a senior citizen center for a decade will be vacated sometime this summer, and city officials are pondering what to do with the structure.

Options range from renovating it for community groups offering classes to tearing it down, according to City Manager John Thacker.Kaysville bought the old house, which dates back to the 1920s or 1930s, in 1980 as part of the city's master plan to acquire all of the property on the downtown block occupied by the municipal building and city library. That plan is complete, except for another home just east of city hall.

The home was first turned into a meal site for senior citizens by the county's Council on Aging, then gradually its use expanded to offering additional senior citizen programs, Thacker said.

A new $1.2 million senior center, called Autumnglow Center, is nearing completion on the same block, and senior activities at the Silverage Center will be moved.

Several community groups, hearing about the potential space opening up, inquired about the center's future, Thacker said. Groups offering arts and crafts, aerobics, dance, and other lessons, hunter safety instruction, and a United Way program center are all possibilities, he said.

The city may also use the building, which needs some refurbishing, as a storage site, he said. The two-story home's upstairs is being used for light storage now.

Thacker said the city building inspector toured the facility and made recommendations for rehabilitation before the house is used as a public facility again. Those recommendations include some structural renovation and rebuilding the handicapped access ramp, Thacker said.

Although estimating the old home is "several decades old," Thacker said the city doesn't consider the house to have any special historical significance to Kaysville, so preservation as a historic site is not an issue.

Discussion of the building's future came up last month at a City Council meeting but hasn't been discussed since then, Thacker said, as the council has become involved in budget and other priority matters.