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100,000 RIGHTISTS IN S. AFRICA RALLY FOR WHITE POWER

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In the biggest display of white power in recent decades, South African right-wingers rallied at a national shrine Saturday and roared "No" to reformist President F.W. de Klerk.

About 100,000 whites, mostly Afrikaners of Dutch descent, gathered at the Voortrekker monument and shouted their rejection of De Klerk's plans to share power with the black majority after 300 years of white supremacy.Asked if they wanted De Klerk to negotiate for them, they rose to their feet and shouted, "No, no, no."

They rose again, cheering and applauding, when their leader, Conservative Party chief Andries Treurnicht, declared: "Fellow citizens, our third freedom struggle has begun."

De Klerk, meanwhile, arrived home after a landmark nine-nation tour designed to convince the world his reforms were irreversible. He was greeted by a rousing welcome from crowds of supporters at Johannesburg's Jan Smuts airport.

"The road to normal relationships for South Africa is open," De Klerk told the largely white crowd of more than 1,000.

The rightist rally, meanwhile, posed a challenge to the reforms - packing an amphitheater at the Voortrekker memorial on a hillside above Pretoria, to hear Treurnicht accuse a "dictatorial" De Klerk of betraying his people.

Treurnicht's party is fiercely opposed to power-sharing talks that De Klerk has entered with African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela, who was speaking at a soccer stadium in the nearby black township of Atteridgeville Saturday.

At the stadium, some 60,000 ANC supporters heard Mandela call for Europe to maintain sanctions until apartheid was dead.