Facebook Twitter

STEEL DAYS GIVE AM.F. SOMETHING TO CROW OVER

SHARE STEEL DAYS GIVE AM.F. SOMETHING TO CROW OVER

In 1948, American Fork proved it wasn't "chicken."

The world was recovering from World War II, and American Fork wanted to reinstitute Poultry Days, its annual city celebration. But some things had changed.The city had been celebrating Poultry Days since 1918, because the principal source of income was chicken raising, said Dave Greenwood, who was American Fork's mayor in 1948.

In that year Geneva Steel had become the main industry "so we changed the name to Steel Days," said Pamela Baldwin, secretary of the 1990 Steel Days celebration.

The thing Greenwood, now retired from city service, remembers most about those first years of Steel Days was the parade.

"We had around 140 floats," he said. "That's about as much as the Days of '47 has."

That was also the beginning of the town's recreation program, Baldwin said. Those first few celebrations helped keep the program going.

Greenwood said American Fork was unique because, instead of hiring a policeman to cover the post-war population increase, the city found a full-time recreation director.

"It has made a lot of difference," he said.

Today the celebration pays for itself, brings recognition to American Fork and helps fund the Miss American Fork Beauty Pageant, Baldwin said. This year's Steel Days will be held Thursday, July 19, through Saturday, July 21, and will feature a daily carnival, a variety show, parades and other activities.

According to Baldwin, the city is providing a special discount on carnival ticket prices. The regular price of 75 cents per ticket will be reduced to four for $1 until the carnival sets up July 18.

The discount tickets can be purchased from various merchants throughout the American Fork area. The carnival will be at Robinson Park, 100 E. Main Street.