Facebook Twitter

LINDON RESIDENTS TO VOTE ON WHETHER TO BUILD THE CITY’S FIRST CEMETERY

SHARE LINDON RESIDENTS TO VOTE ON WHETHER TO BUILD THE CITY’S FIRST CEMETERY

Come November, Lindon will have a chance to acquire something the city has never had. It's a cemetery, and city officials are dying to get their hands on it.

"We would make a terrible mistake if we didn't take care of our own people," Mayor Noal Greenwood said at Wednesday's City Council meeting."We have never had a cemetery," he said. "Never have we offered that to our residents in Lindon. We ought to provide for our citizens."

The city has the land all ready to go, but the people will decide whether the land is bought and the cemetery is built. The question will be on the November ballot.

"If the citizens don't want one then we won't build one," Greenwood said. But an informal show of hands among the 20 or so residents present produced not one opposing vote.

Councilman Mark Walker, who headed a study on the idea of having a cemetery in Lindon, said the significant issues were citizens' opinions on the idea and the cost of the project.

The proposed seven-acre site measures 650 feet by 470 feet, bordered by 200 East and 600 North. Shirl Tomlinson, the property's owner, is offering it for $175,000 at a rate of 5 percent annual interest over 20 years. That amounts to $14,042 a year until 2011.

"It's an excellent offer," said Greenwood, who noted that Tomlinson has other buyers lined up if the city won't bite. "It's all set up for us."

Other costs are also involved. Street improvements on 200 East, irrigation ditch piping, a looping road through the cemetery and other landscaping would total more than $135,000. Design and improvement on individual plots would cost $168,000, while another $15,000 would be spent annually on maintenance.

The total cost would amount to about $45,000 a year for 20 years.

Thurgood said the land could hold 8,287 plots. He recommended the city sell the plots at $250 each, with another $150 charge for digging each grave, preparing it and covering it again. At that rate he estimated the city would make a net profit of $856,000.Several residents said they would pay to be buried in their own community.

Without a cemetery in Lindon, people have been looking elsewhere. For non-residents, however, a burial in another community can be costly. Orem, for example, charges $250 for residents and $500 for non-residents.