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BUSH COLLAPSES AT TOKYO DINNER

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President Bush collapsed during a state dinner Wednesday and the White House said he suffered from stomach flu. "I feel good," said an ashen Bush, but he went to bed early and planned to resume rigorous trade talks with Japanese officials Thursday.

Presidential spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said Bush felt nauseated before the state dinner hosted by Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa. At about 8:20 p.m. the president vomited and collapsed.Physicians and Secret Service agents sprang to the president's side, and he left a few minutes later for Akasaka Palace, his temporary residence here.

"I feel good," Bush said, though he appeared haggard and disheveled as he was escorted to his limousine. He walked slowly, closely surrounded by security agents.The 67-year-old president went to sleep after taking medication for nausea, officials said.

The White House said Bush would skip a breakfast meeting on Thursday but otherwise would stick by his schedule, which calls for a full round of meetings and a news conference.

He is to return to Washington on Friday after a 12-day, 26,000-mile journey through Australia and Asia.

Television pictures showed a frightening picture of Bush in extreme distress. Bush vomited at his seat and was helped to the floor by Secret Service agents, Fitzwater said. He said the president was in a "faint condition."

Bush appeared disoriented, his mouth agape.

A Secret Service agent leaped over the table and knelt beside the president, prone on the floor. Other agents rushed to positions around the president, motioning guests to stay away.

Barbara Bush jumped from her chair at the head table and moved toward the president but stopped several feet away, a worried look on her face. Bush remained on the floor "a few minutes," Fitzwater said.

Standing on his own power, Bush was wrapped in a coat. Smiling, he raised his hand in a salute to the audience and shook hands with Miyazawa and left the dinner. Guests stood and applauded as he departed.

"I just wanted to get a little attention," Bush joked, according to Fitzwater.

Although the White House tried to play down the episode, it raised fresh questions about Bush's health as he heads into a campaign for re-election. The president was hospitalized last year after suffering a rapid heartbeat May 4 at Camp David. His problem was later diagnosed as a thyroid ailment, Graves' disease.

In Washington, Vice President Dan Quayle was notified of Bush's illness and went immediately to the White House, although he planned to go ahead to New Hampshire for a campaign trip. Bush is expected to announce for re-election after his Jan. 28 State of the Union address.

Bush's five children also were notified.