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NATO VOTES TO ENFORCE U.N. BAN ON SERBIAN FLIGHTS OVER BOSNIA

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NATO has voted to enforce the U.N. ban on Serbian military flights over Bosnia-Herzegovina, but it hasn't said what action it would take.

Britain and 11 other countries in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization urge caution, while the United States, the Netherlands, Turkey and France want to use allied airpower, possibly shooting down Serb violators.The foreign ministers met Friday with their counterparts from Eastern Europe to discuss ways to promote European stability, including the use of NATO troops as peacekeepers.

U.S. Secretary of State Lawrence Eagleburger criticized France for blocking a NATO proposal for joint military training and exercises with the alliance's East European neighbors.

Meanwhile, the chief U.N. mediator in the Balkans denounced a Serb offer to end the Bosnian war by Christmas, saying it didn't offer rival Muslims an "honorable settlement."

Bosnian Serb leaders on Thursday said the war would be over within eight days and that the current battle lines, which give Serbs control of most of the country, would become the boundaries of a new Serbian Republic in Bosnia.

The Serb declaration appeared aimed at blunting recent mounting criticism and preparations by the West to use force to stop Serb attacks on Croats and Muslims.

In the Serb province of Kosovo, Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic wrapped up his reelection campaign on Friday.

Milosevic, despite growing disaffection at home, is regarded as having a good chance to win re-election. Still, recent polls put his challenger, an American businessman who is Yugoslavia's moderate premier, slightly ahead.

Milosevic's election challenger, Serbian-born Milan Panic, has preached peace and change, and alienated nationalists by seeking talks with Kosovo's Albanians.