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NRA JOINS POLICE IN SAYING SONG IS OUT OF LINE

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The National Rifle Association, whose defense of gun ownership often puts it at odds with law enforcement agencies, joined police Friday in condemning a best-selling rap music album that contains the song "Cop Killer."

NRA Executive Vice President Wayne LaPierre urged members and concerned citizens to write to the record label, Warner Bros. Records, and the distributor, Time Warner Inc., asking them to withdraw the "Body Count" album, by Los Angeles rapper, Ice-T.The song "Cop Killer," contains the lyrics, "I got my 12-gauge sawed off. I got my headlights turned off. I'm 'bout to bust some shots off. I'm 'bout to dust some cops off."

LaPierre called the song "an outrage," adding in a statement released here: "Researchers indicate a causal link between violent behavior and violence in the media.

"Time Warner uses its (Time) magazine to depict violence in our streets and promote gun prohibition, and then they turn around and use their music label to sell songs about murdering police officers."

LaPierre said if Time Warner really cared about reducing violence in America: "They would put an immediate end to distributing this disgusting album."

LaPierre was joined by Los Angeles City Councilwoman Joan Milke Flores, who introduced a motion in the Council calling for Time Warner to voluntarily remove the album from record store shelves.

Earlier this week, the Combined Law Enforcement Association of Texas called for a boycott of Time Warner and threatened to demonstrate at the company's July 16 shareholders meeting in Beverly Hills if the company does not dissociate itself from the album and issue an apology to police officers nationwide.

Time Warner, in a statement, said it was committed to the free expression of ideas for all its authors, journalists, recording artists, screenwriters, actors and directors.

"We believe this is crucial to a democratic society where the full range of opinion and thought - whether we agree with it or not - must be able to find an outlet," the statement said.

A company spokesman said Ice-T was not available for comment.