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DEPORTEES SAY KILLING OF OFFICER PROVES EXPULSION HAS FAILED TO CURTAIL VIOLENCE

SHARE DEPORTEES SAY KILLING OF OFFICER PROVES EXPULSION HAS FAILED TO CURTAIL VIOLENCE

Palestinians deported by Israel said Monday the killing of an Israeli secret police officer in Jerusalem proved Israel was wrong in saying their expulsion would curb anti-Israeli violence.

The killing boosted the morale of the 415 Palestinians who were deported for suspected links with Muslim fundamentalist violence against Israeli occupation troops in the West Bank and Gaza Strip."Rabin has brought disaster on his people," said Abdul Aziz al-Rantisi, a leader of the deportees and of the Islamic Resistance Movement Hamas. He was referring to Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, who ordered the Dec. 17 expulsions.

"This deportation of clerics, doctors, engineers and educated people has proved to be a failure for Israel," Rantisi said.

"It did not secure the safety of the Israelis. The killing of this Shin Bet officer boosts the morale not only of the deportees but of the whole Palestinian people," he added.

Haim Nachmani, 25, an agent of the General Security Services commonly known as Shin Bet, was stabbed and bludgeoned to death in Jewish West Jerusalem Sunday by an Arab informer he had arranged to meet.

It was the first time in at least 10 years that a Shin Bet man has been killed in the course of duty.

"This is a powerful blow against the Israeli intelligence services," said Sheikh Bassem as-Shami, the leader of Islamic Jihad members in the deportees' freezing camp on a rocky hillside in south Lebanon.

"It only goes to show that we were not the ones doing the killings. And as long as we are deported it will only give the fighters more reason to deal the Israelis more blows," he said.

Rabin ordered the expulsion of the Palestinians - the biggest mass deportation since Israel captured the West Bank and Gaza Strip in 1967 - after Hamas kidnapped and killed an Israeli soldier.

Israel said the deportees were linked to Hamas and the Islamic Jihad in Palestine movement. Many of them say they had only sympathized with the groups.

Stuck on a cold hillside in a south Lebanon no man's land for more than two weeks, the Palestinians said they received no smuggled food from villagers overnight after appealing for the smuggling to stop after it provoked Israeli shelling.

Journalists saw no sign of fresh supplies in the muddy camp wedged between the Leb-anese and Israeli frontlines.

Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik al-Hariri said Monday he would never back down on his refusal to allow the Palestinians into government-controlled territory - even if they die in the camp.

"I cannot take responsibility for everyone on earth . . . I hope, I pray, they don't die there. But it is not my responsibility," Hariri told Reuters in an interview.

"Our refusal is final. . . . We feel very sorry for what might happen to any of the deportees. But it is not a humanitarian problem. It is a political problem," he added.