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THE N.Y. POST PROCLAIMS IT’S `HERE TO STAY’

SHARE THE N.Y. POST PROCLAIMS IT’S `HERE TO STAY’

Back from the dead, The New York Post hit the streets Tuesday with its old swagger, proclaiming it's "HERE TO STAY."

The nation's oldest continuously published daily went to press after its unions agreed to $6.2 million in concessions demanded by Rupert Murdoch - its once and future owner - as a condition for rescuing the money-losing tabloid.The 192-year-old Post had suspended publication on Friday after Murdoch failed to come to terms with the unions. But a weekend of calls between Gov. Mario Cuomo, the unions and Murdoch executives yielded a breakthrough Monday.

"You can't kill us. We've been given the last rites so often I've started to speak Latin," columnist Jack Newfield said.

Staff members dusted off a portrait of Post founder Alexander Hamilton and put a smile and a thumbs-up gesture on him for Tuesday's front page, next to the headline, in red, "HERE TO STAY."

The crisis was the fourth time in five years that the Post went to the brink.

"The Post is like a dead fish flopping on the dock, gasping for air. Every now and then we come back and kick it in the water," reporter Timothy McDarrah said.

The decision to publish came after 10 production unions agreed to the reduced costs and The Newspaper Guild, which represents 290 editorial, advertising and circulation employees, agreed to return to work while continuing to negotiate a new contract. In all, 725 people work at the Post.

Murdoch's News America Publishing Corp. said it would now proceed with negotiations to buy the paper and lift it out of bankruptcy court.

Murdoch will manage the paper in the meantime.