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COST OF HEALTH CARE MAY BE IMPORTANT, BUT LEAKY POP CANS REALLY STIR MOM UP

SHARE COST OF HEALTH CARE MAY BE IMPORTANT, BUT LEAKY POP CANS REALLY STIR MOM UP

"You've got to be kidding!" Golda spluttered, as she read the results of a poll by Special Report magazine. "Eighty-nine percent of the women who were asked what made them mad last week said it was the rising cost of medical care."

"Well," I said, "doesn't it bother you to pay more for a pair of contact lenses than a new vacuum?'"Sure," my friend laughed, "especially since I wouldn't need a vacuum if I couldn't see the dirt. But I still think whoever planned that poll left a few categories out - like husbands who put empty ice cube trays back in the freezer and kids who don't wipe their feet."

"Maybe those pollsters were just dealing with large issues," I ventured.

"Large issues! Who says my 15-year-old's muddy footprints down the hall are not large issues?"

"What I mean is areas of national concern."

"Are you saying that women all over the nation don't get concerned when their kids won't eat vegetables? Are you suggesting that nine out of ten American females welcome the sight of leaky pop cans left in the family room?"

"No," I answered, "but leaky pop cans left in the family room can hardly be considered an American emergency. Anyway, I should think you'd be able to tell from the title of that magazine article, "Women and Anger - What's Making You Mad," that it was focusing on feminist issues like women in the work force and the inavailability of quality child care."

Golda's eyes opened wide. "I hadn't thought about it that way," she admitted.

"So, if someone asked you what made your blood boil last week, would you still be thinking about muddy feet and leaky pop cans?"

"No," said Golda, enlightened mother of five teenage sons, "I think I understand now about feminist issues of national concern: In every bathroom, there's this yellow ring . . . "