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CHELIMO BREAKS 10,000 RECORD; FREDERICKS WINS

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The Spencer Davis Group's 1960s hit "Keep on Running" blared from Olympic Stadium's loudspeakers during the final laps.

And that's what Richard Chelimo did, slashing the world 10,000-meter record by 32 hundredths of a second in Monday's DN-Galan Grand Prix track and field meet.Chelimo, a 20-year-old Kenyan, completed the grueling race in 27 minutes, 7.91 seconds. Arturo Barrios of Mexico, who set the previous record in 1989, was a distant runnerup in 27:34.27.

It was the 84th world record set at the stadium built for the 1912 Summer Games, and the second since 1990 when Steve Backley of Britain hit 89.58 meters in the javelin. No other stadium boasts as many world records.

And it was especially sweet for Chelimo, who was second in both the 1991 World Outdoor Track and Field Championships in Tokyo and the Barcelona Olympics last year.

Kevin Young, the Olympic champion and world record holder, proved why he was named the 1992 track and field athlete of the year by winning the 400 hurdles in 49.61 despite hitting the final hurdle hard.

Young, who set the world record of 46.78 in the Olympic final, held off fellow American Terrence Zellner by five hundredths of a second to extend his unbeaten streak to more than 20 races.

American athletes won six events, but Michael Johnson missed a seventh in the 200 after misjudging the finish line in his first European outdoor race of the season.

Frank Fredericks of Namibia, a silver medalist in both the 100 and 200 in the Olympics, caught Johnson near the finish to win in a new stadium record of 20.21. Johnson was .04 behind.

Gail Devers, another Olympic champion from the U.S., won the women's 100 meters in 11.04 for the third fastest time of the year. Gwen Torrence was second in 11.13.

Other American winners were world record holder Mike Powell in the long jump (27 feet, 6 inches); Hollis Conway in the high jump (7-7), Mark Everett in the 800 (1:45.33) and Kim Batten in the women's 400 hurdles (54.63).