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WEBER LANDFILL MAY LIVE ON AS AN URBAN NATURE PARK

SHARE WEBER LANDFILL MAY LIVE ON AS AN URBAN NATURE PARK

After its closure in 1996, the Weber County landfill may live on as an urban nature park offering varied wildlife habitats, fishing and a network of foot, bicycle and equestrian trails.

Boosters envision a park offering picnic areas, sand volleyball courts, horseshoe pits, an amphitheater and possibly a baseball field.Once state and local officials refine the proposal over the next month, it may be presented for public hearings before the Ogden Planning Commission and City Council, said county landfill director Lloyd Barney.

The landfill is south of west Ogden's residential neighborhoods, just across the river from Fort Buenaventura State Park.

Park Manager Steve Fielding said a nature park would complement Fort Buenaventura.

"Certainly having something across the river from us is going to benefit us," Fielding said.

Nature park operations may be assisted by the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, said spokesman Rory Reynolds. The agency would especially be interested in helping with habitat enhancement along the Weber River.

Such projects may include removal of concrete dumped along the banks, creation of pools, fish stocking and construction of handicapped-accessible fishing docks, Reynolds said.