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DISCLOSURE FORMS REVEAL BIG BUCKS

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Half of the Utahns who are in Congress or are running for it may be millionaires.

Ironically, they are fighting to represent a state with the fourth-lowest income per capita in America - just $13,079 per person per year.Of the 11 major Utah congressional candidates and incumbents who filed personal financial disclosure forms, four are definitely millionaires - and two others may be.

The millionaires are Sen. Bob Bennett, R-Utah, and all three contenders for Utah's 2nd District House seat: Rep. Karen Shepherd, D-Utah; Republican Enid Greene Waldholtz; and independent Mer-rill Cook.

The two others who also may be millionaires are Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, and Rep. Bill Orton, D-Utah. They say they are not, but disclosure forms show they could be. Their wealth is revealed only within broad ranges, which happen to fall on both sides of the million-dollar threshold.

The five others who are not millionaires are Rep. Jim Hansen, R-Utah; his Democratic opponent, Bobbie Coray; Democratic Senate candidate Pat Shea; and Republican 3rd District House candidates Tom Draschil and Dixie Thomp-son.

The documents show the incumbents and candidates have an average net worth between $3.5 million and $5.7 million. That, however, doesn't include the value of their personal homes and cars - so it could be even higher.

The figures, though, are skewed by Bennett, who appears to be worth far more than the others and may be worth as much as all of them combined.

Forms - plus extra investment portfolio details that Bennett chose to provide - show his net worth is between $29 million and $33.2 million "or more."

Most of that comes from his $23.8 million worth of stock in Franklin Quest, which makes Franklin day planners. He once headed that company and oversaw its booming growth.

Despite that wealth, forms show Bennett and his family still have a middle-class touch. His wife, Joyce, taught flute lessons to chip in "over $1,000" in income for the family. "She is a nationally recognized player and has taught for years," said Bennett's press secretary, Mary Jane Collipriest.

The only candidate who could be as rich as Bennett is Cook. His forms show he is worth $2.2 million to $2.4 million "or more." The trick is figuring out how much that "or more" may be.

Categories on forms show his portion of a family explosives company is worth "over $1 million." Cook says the company is privately held and determining its exact worth is difficult. "But it is much more than $1 million. That's about all I care to say," he said.

On the other end of the spectrum is 3rd District candidate Thompson. Her forms show she is worth between -$32,966 (as in she may be in the hole that much) and $46,000 without counting her home and cars.

Her husband, Ken, said, "When you count in our home and cars, we have a positive net value, but we obviously aren't rich. We had a son who had cancer five years ago . . . and we put five kids through college. They are close in age and hit college in a flock. One is still there."

He said his wife also gave up a $50,000 a year job to take a $19,030 job as a part-time Emery County commissioner, "even though she works full time at it."

Following are income, wealth and other figures for incumbents and challengers. Congress is scheduled to publicly release their forms next week, but individuals provided them early in response to Deseret News requests.

All were also asked to supply a copy of their tax forms to help fill in gaps in disclosure forms. Only Shea chose to do so.

His campaign manager, Rob Rice, attacked Hatch for not providing his tax forms. "Hatch's reluctance is indicative of the attitude a politician develops after 18 years in Congress, that the public is not entitled to know everything. Pat Shea feels differently."

U.S. Senate

Sen. Bob Bennett, R-Utah.

Net worth: Between $28.99 million and $33.16 million "or more," according to documents. Figures don't include personal homes or cars.

1993 income: Between $325,469 and $1.36 million. He lists his Senate salary at $132,857. His wife earned "over $1,000" for giving flute lessons. His income from stocks and other investments was between $192,612 and $1.23 million.

Trips paid by outside groups: Round trip from Washington, D.C., to San Francisco paid by the American Medical Society; round trip to Naples, Fla., paid by the Non-Prescriptive Drug Manufacturers Association; round trip from Washington, D.C., to Salt Lake City paid by Franklin Quest for a speaking engagement.

Memberships: Unpaid director of Franklin Quest; unpaid trustee of W.F. & F.G. Bennett Trust.

Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah

Net worth: Between $378,0227 and $1.23 million (not counting personal homes or cars).

1993 income: Between $163,727 and $219,015. That includes his Senate salary of $133,600, a $1,000 royalty for writing a chapter in the forthcoming book "Looking Forward," and income on investments of between $29,127 and $75,415.

Honorariums: Groups to whom Hatch spoke paid $22,500 in lieu of speech fees directly to charities of his choice. Hatch did not disclose which charities received the money.

Trips paid by outside groups: Round trip to Salt Lake City paid by Senators Ski Cup Inc.; round trip from Washington, D.C., to Boston paid by Lubavitch of Eastern Massachusetts; round trip from Washington, D.C., to Sun Valley, Idaho, by the Utah State Bar Association; round trip to Las Vegas paid by the National Nutritional Foods Association; round trip to Detroit paid by the National Council of La Raza.

Candidate Pat Shea 1/3 Net worth: $4,005 and $229,988 (not counting personal homes or cars). One of his minor assets is a limited partnership in the Boston Celtics. But Utah Jazz fans shouldn't be too upset. It is worth only $5 and was given to him as a joke.

1993 income: Between $311,560 and $318,754. That included earned income of $307,254 from his work as a lawyer and his wife's work as a nurse, and income on investments of between $4,306 and $11,500. His income included a $5,514 loss on his marketing of a coupon organizer called "Shea's Aisle View."

Memberships: President of the Patrick A. Shea law firm; vice president of the Utah Families Foundation; president of the Utah Freedom Trail; president of Friends of Utah Golf; and secretary of the John Gower Society at the University of North Carolina at Ashville.

U.S. House

1st District

Rep. Jim Hansen, R-Utah

Net worth: Between $18,005 and $264,998 (not counting personal homes or cars).

1993 income: Between $138,803 and $150,000. That includes his House salary of $133,600 plus income on investments of $5,203 to $16,400. Between $5,001 and $15,000 of that came from renting a log cabin he owns to his re-election committee.

Honorariums: Groups to whom Hansen spoke paid $1,025 in lieu of speech fees directly to charities of his choice. He did not disclose which charities received the money.

Trips paid by outside interests: Round trip to Tel Aviv, Israel, paid by the American-Israel Educational Foundation; round trip to Orlando, Fla., paid by the Aircraft Owners & Pilots Association, and a round trip to Phoenix paid by the Western Regional Council.

Memberships: Secretary of the Committee on Limiting Terms, which wants to limit House service to six terms. Hansen is currently seeking an eighth term, which would make him the longest-serving House member from Utah.

Candidate Bobbie Coray 1/3 Net worth: Between $134,009 and $412,002 (not including personal cars or home).

1993 income: Between $36,129 and $38,527, but did not include her husband's income, which was not disclosed. That figure included her $35,526 salary as the economic development director for Cache County, and income from investments of between $603 and $3,001.

Memberships: Director, Utah State University Credit Union.

2nd District

Rep. Karen Shepherd, D-Utah

Net worth: Between $1.29 million and $3.5 million (not counting personal homes or cars).

1993 income: Between $190,658 and $312,900. That included her House salary of $133,600 and income on investments of between $57,058 and $179,300.

Trips paid by outside interests: Round trip to Brunswick, Ga., paid by the Women's Legal Defense Fund; round trip to San Diego paid by the Economic Policy Institute; round trip over proposed wilderness locations near Moab paid by the Sierra Club.

Of note, Shepherd has been pushing legislation to ban "recreational trips" paid by outside interests. Her administrative assistant, Michael Burke, said, "None of the trips she took fall in that category. They were working trips."

Candidate Enid Greene Waldholtz 1/3 Net worth: Between $2.07 and $4.54 million (not counting personal cars or home). Besides stocks, treasury notes and other investments, her assets include coins worth between $250,001 and $500,000.

1993 income: Between $205,041 and $1.23 million. That includes her $54,428 salary as a corporate lawyer for Novell, but did not include her husband's salary for his work for the Utah Republican Party. Their income from investments was between $150,613 and $1.17 million.

Memberships: Chairman, Young Republican National Federation; board member, Travelers Aid Society; board member, BYU Law School Alumni Association; and vice president, Business Software Alliance.

Candidate Merrill Cook 1/3 Net worth: Between $2.17 and $2.4 million "or more" (not counting his personal home or cars).

1993 income: Between $112,705 and $1.04 million. That included $2,407 director's fee from Cook Associates Inc. The rest of his income came from investments.

Memberships: President and director, Cook Associates Inc.

3rd District

Rep. Bill Orton, D-Utah

Net worth: Between $364,017 and $1.31 million (not counting his personal homes or cars).

1993 income: Between $149,014 and $168,700. That includes his House salary of $133,600 and income from investments between $15,414 and $35,100.

Trips paid by outside groups: Round trip to Fort Lauderdale, Fla., paid by the Real Estate Tax Institute; and a trip to Phoenix paid by the Western Independent Bankers.

Memberships: Trustee, Great Western Trail Foundation.

Candidate Tom Draschil 1/3 Net worth: Between $67,009 and $950,995 (not counting personal cars or home).

1993 income: Between $95,624 and $203,319. That includes $48,119 he made from selling and remodeling homes, and between $47,505 and $155,200 in income from investments.

Memberships: Director, Aid in Mexico.

Candidate Dixie Thompson 1/3 Net worth: Between -$32,966 and $46,000 (not counting personal cars and home).

1993 income: Between $19,434 and $21,432 (which does not include her husband's income, which was not disclosed). That includes her $19,030 salary as an Emery County commissioner, and between $404 and $2,402 in income from investments.

Memberships: Emery County commissioner; board member, Utah State Highway Joint Committee; secretary, Utah Association of Counties Insurance Mutual; board member, South Eastern Utah Board of Health; associate member, South Eastern Utah Board of Mental Health; board member, Utah Comprehensive County Planning Commission.