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REAL-LIFE WILMA CHIPS AWAY AT MOUNTAIN OF MAIL IN BEDROCK

SHARE REAL-LIFE WILMA CHIPS AWAY AT MOUNTAIN OF MAIL IN BEDROCK

Fred and Barney may not live here, but there is a Wilma Flintstone in this tiny town near the Utah border.

"If there's a Bedrock, there's got to be a Wilma," said resident Lynda Ayers. She has lived in the pebble-size town most of her life."Somebody's got to do it," she said.

Ayers' husband, like Fred Flintstone, is an equipment operator at a Montrose County gravel pit. But that coincidence is not why she is Bedrock's true Wilma.

Ayers, 60, has been answering letters sent to the fictional Flintstone and Rubble families sent to the tiny Bedrock post office - the only one in the nation - for two decades.

And she is sharpening her pencils in anticipation of more mail as "The Flintstones" movie hits the box office.

Most of the hundreds of pieces of mail are addressed simply to "Bedrock, USA." Rather than returning the letters to sender, Bedrock postmaster Carol Sue Latham - a graduate of Bedrock Grade School - turns them over to Ayers.

Ayers fields questions such as "How's Barney doing?" and "Do you still live in a cave?" Although she signs the letters from either Wilma or Betty Rubble, she says she tells of life in real Bedrock, and not the "modern Stone Age" times of the cartoon.

The real Bedrock was settled in the late 1870s as a mining town and boasts a population of 50 families.

There is nothing "stone age" about the mail that arrives for the Flintstones. It ranges from investment statements from Merrill Lynch - where someone has set up a $160 account for Wilma - to a letter telling Betty that she had been selected out of thousands of applicants to win an 11x14 family portrait.