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CAMBODIAN PEACE TALKS END WITH NO TRUCE DATE

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Cambodian peace talks ended in failure Thursday as the Khmer Rouge guerrilla group refused to agree to a date to begin a truce.

The government offered a truce starting June 30, but the Khmer Rouge evidently wants to reach an agreement first on how much power the group would get in the government if it laid down arms."We have done our utmost to reach national reconciliation and peace, but to no avail at this meeting," Khmer Rouge delegate Mak Ben said after two days of talks in Phnom Penh.

"We want a cease-fire, (but) we should avoid a cease-fire which cheats one another," he said.

He said the talks failed to address the Khmer Rouge demand for a "minimum political platform" that would be the basis for formation of a new national government and army that included the Khmer Rouge.

The government wants a truce before going on to negotiate power-sharing.

King Norodom Sihanouk has said he would not sponsor more talks if this week's sessions failed. The first round of Sihanouk-sponsored talks, in North Korea late last month, also failed.

The government was formed after U.N.-organized elections in May 1993, which the Khmer Rouge boycotted.

During its Communist rule in the 1970s, the Khmer Rouge killed, worked or starved to death hundreds of thousands of people. It was toppled from power by a Vietnamese invasion in late 1978 but has since been fighting from the jungles. The guerrilla army, estimated at 9,000-strong, controls large slices of western and northern Cambodia.

The battlefields are relatively calm now as the rainy season starts. During the dry season, the guerrillas rolled back government gains and advanced to within 13 miles of Cambodia's second-largest city, Battambang in the west, before being pushed back.