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IF STATES SAY NO, TRIBES MUST SAY NO TO GAMES

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The Supreme Court on Monday refused to let Indian tribes continue offering a popular, high-tech form of gambling without permission from the states in which their reservations are located.

The court, without comment, turned down arguments by eight tribes that federal law allows them to operate video pull-tab games even if state officials object.The tribes had said that hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue and thousands of jobs for Indians could be lost if reservations had to stop offering the games.

In other actions Monday, the justices:

- Allowed a California company to continue requiring most of its employees to speak only English on the job. The court let stand a ruling that said the company did not discriminate illegally against Spanish-speaking employees.

- Turned aside an attack on a 1990 federal law aimed at making more public places accessible to physically disabled people. The court let stand a ruling that ordered the International House of Pancakes to renovate a restroom in a San Diego restaurant to make accessible to the disabled.

- Made it harder for some coal miners and longshoremen, or their survivors, to collect disability or death benefits. Such people have the burden of proving their claims, the court ruled.