Facebook Twitter

OTHER VIEWS

The New York Times

AMA VS. HEALTH REFORM:

Until recently, it looked as if the American Medical Association would vigorously support national health reform and thereby end an inglorious 50-year record of steadfast opposition...

But now that the debate over reform is approaching a climax, the AMA is changing its tune. It has backed away from employer mandates and...proposed a bill, laughably named the Patient Protection Act, that could eviscerate the Clinton plan. Same old AMA...an obstacle for Congress to overcome.

The Dallas Morning News

JURY SANITY:

A Fort Worth jury brought a dose of sanity to the justice system...when it turned the tables on a man who sued for damages he suffered in a fight with a police officer. Not only were jurors unsympathetic to Jesus Puentes' $1.7 million claim that a bystander, Lee Lively, used excessive force to stop him from killing or seriously injuring Cpl. Randy Whisenhunt, they reversed the charges and ordered Mr. Puentes to pay $1.7 million to the police officer.

We need to keep hearing verdicts like this one...Individuals who choose to commit crimes are fully responsible for what happens to them. It was their choice. It should be their consequence.

The Washington Post

EUROPE MIGRATION: Migration is becoming one of the great forces changing the world's politics, and nowhere more dramatically than in Europe...In the 1990s, an era of cheap travel and relaxed border controls, millions are on the move, drawn by prosperity and pushed by fear and war at home.

...Even law-abiding people of the most humane instincts find this rapid inflow of strangers to be troubling-- a drain on public budgets and a threat to customs...

Dealing with (pressures of migration) fairly and decently is close to the top of the list of urgent necessities that...are taking Europe's politicians by surprise.

Los Angeles Times

CHINA TRADE: President Clinton acted appropriately in decoupling human rights from trade policy in renewing most-favored-nation trading status for China. It was a difficult political decision, but one thoughtfully made in recognistion of the need to build a productive, long-term, strategic relationship with China.

A China engaged and open is far more desirable than a communist giant in isolation. Clinton now believes that advances in human rights are far more likely under improved relations and when they are not beneath the cloud of annual MFN review. With China in flux, Congress should support President Clinton's balanced decision on MFN...

Chicago Tribune

SOLZHENITSYN WORK: Alexander Solzhenitsyn was quoted...as saying his years in exile in the United States were "the most creative period of my life, the most productive period of my life." Take him at his word. Assume he speaks sincerely and was not merely flattering...the people who took him in when his own country expelled him.

The fact is, however, that few professional critics or even ordinary readers would say that the Nobel Prize winner's work during his 20 years in exile compares favorably with what he produced before the Brezhnev regime forced him out of the Soviet Union...

By sending him into exile, the Soviets may have inflicted the worst punishment they could have on Solzhenitsyn-- even worse than confining him in their Gulag archipelago-- by cutting him off from the spiritual source of his art...

Perhaps, reconnected now with the soil of his motherland, he will find again the voice that once rattled the Kremlin.