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PARKWEST SLIDES INTO HISTORY: NEW NAME IS WOLF MOUNTAIN

SHARE PARKWEST SLIDES INTO HISTORY: NEW NAME IS WOLF MOUNTAIN

The new owners of the former ParkWest Ski Resort have changed its name to Wolf Mountain.

The price of a daylong ski pass will increase this year, up from $19 to $25.The name was among about 2,000 submitted in a contest sponsored by the resort, winning over such nominees as Polygamist Pass and Sweet Peaks.

The change, announced this weekend and advertised on a sign that went up Sunday, hasn't stuck yet with workers, however.

"Thank you for calling ParkWest," a receptionist answering the resort's phone said Monday morning. "Oops, I mean Wolf Mountain."

"There were an awful lot of animal names suggested," said Kenny Griswald, partners in the resort with Michael and Annette Baker.

Grizzly Mountain was probably the most mentioned, he said. Hidden Peak, Moose Mountain, Serenity and Broken Bones were among the contenders.

"We wanted something that reflects our image, promoting the protection of the open space, the area's natural gifts . . . it's about hidden beauty, natural beauty," said Griswald, noting that the resort's loftiest and most scenic land has never been open to skiers.

But plans are to open the back country. Griswald said construction has begun on a lift to Murdock Peak and that talks are in progress with hotel developers who would add another lift.

Griswald said the change is part of a larger effort to expand the resort, which is north of Park City in the Snyderville Basin, one of the state's fastest-growing areas.

He said the resort for the first time in its 26-year history this year will begin snowmaking on south-facing slopes. A new hockey arena has been opened in recent weeks, he said, adding that the resort's traditional lineup of summer concerts has been unusually successful.

The resort also is boosting promotions of its restaurant, a new repertory theater, a country-western dance hall and plans to add a nighttime snowboard park.

The group wants to develop 500 new housing units, mixing wooded homesites with condominium clus-ters.

Griswald said the resort last week found developers for 20 condominums that will sell for $250,000 apiece. In keeping with the resort's new image, the 2,000-square-foot units will be constructed of logs, he said.

Winners of the name-change competition, husband and wife Mike and Brooke Bradley, were awarded lifetime ski passes to the resort.