Facebook Twitter

LAW SAYS COMPANIES MUST GIVE SAME BENEFITS TO ADOPTED CHILDREN AND BIOLOGICAL OFFSPRING

SHARE LAW SAYS COMPANIES MUST GIVE SAME BENEFITS TO ADOPTED CHILDREN AND BIOLOGICAL OFFSPRING

Dear Do-It Man: We would like to purchase a Utah state flag as a gift for our stake president. Please tell us how we may obtain one. We have tried for two weeks and no one seems to know. We even contacted administrative services at the State Capitol.

We still don't know where to get one.Why are there so few state flags flown?

- E.M., Providence

Dear E.M.: Utah state flags are sold at retail stores including Modern Display & Fixture Co. at 424 S. 700 East in Salt Lake City, phone, 355-7427.

Your question comes at a good time. The flags are on sale at Modern Display for 40 percent off.

The discounted prices are: $34.13 for a 3-by-5; $40.13 for a 4-by-6; and $67.50 for a 5-by-8.

Insuring Adopted Children

Until recently, the 60,000 children adopted by Americans each year faced a little-known form of discrimination. Many employers refused to provide adopted children's parents with full health-insurance coverage for their new sons and daughters.

A recently passed federal law, however, has changed all that. The measure requires most companies to extend the same benefits to adopted children as they do to biological offspring. "What this means is that all children will be treated equally no matter how they came to their families: by biology or by law," says Steve Humerickhouse of Adoptive Families of America, a Minneapolis adoption-advocacy group.

Under the new statute, children must be offered coverage from the moment parents take legal responsibility for them, even if adoption proceedings aren't complete. Companies must also cover children with pre-existing medical conditions, including many kids adopted before the law was passed who were denied benefits because of such conditions.

It is likely to be months before all employers comply with the new law, according to U.S. Department of Labor officials, who are responsible for enforcing the measure. News of the change simply takes time to travel through the business community, they say.

But Humerickhouse says the Labor Department should be more aggressive in getting the word out. "We've got to get this measure enforced so that adoptive families can concentrate on what is really important: bonding with each other instead of haggling with insurance companies," he says.

-Daniel Glick

(Parenting Magazine)