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DESCENDANTS OF EARLY MAYOR TO HONOR HIM WITH MONUMENT

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Descendants of Andrew Hunter Scott, an early Provo mayor and construction supervisor of the Provo Meeting House, will honor him by dedicating an 11-foot monument in the Provo City Cemetery at 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 14.

The dedication ceremony will include remarks by current and former officers of the family organization and Mayor George Stewart.The memorial was first erected in 1897 to honor the entire Scott family. It was composed of four large stone blocks, one of granite and three of sandstone. The cubes are believed to have come from the same quarries that supplied the stones for the four early LDS temples.

Only the granite base, representing the Salt Lake Temple, remains intact. The three upper sandstone sections had badly weathered and deteriorated.

Members of the Scott family raised $10,000 for the restoration project. Walker Monument of Orem reconstructed the memorial in solid granite blocks, which will not deteriorate like sandstone but were selected to approximate the colors of the original sandstone.

The son of a well-to-do farmer in Pennsylvania, Scott came with his family to the Salt Lake Valley in 1851. He lived in Provo until his death in 1874. He imported sheep to the valley, starting the woolen industry, and is credited with planting the valley's first fruit trees. He served as mayor from 1861-63. He devoted the rest of his life to church service and building the Provo Woolen Mills.

He had five wives, three of whom bore him 24 children. The Andrew Hunter Scott Genealogical Association was formed in the early 1960s.