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PARACHUTING CLAN MEMBERS IN UTAH NATIONAL GUARD BELIEVE A FAMILY THAT JUMPS TOGETHER STAYS TOGETHER

SHARE PARACHUTING CLAN MEMBERS IN UTAH NATIONAL GUARD BELIEVE A FAMILY THAT JUMPS TOGETHER STAYS TOGETHER

Call members of the Logan family a bunch of dropouts and you'll flatter at least four of them.

First Sgt. Harold Logan and three of his eight children are members of the Utah Army National Guard's 19th Special Forces Support Company. They parachute out of airplanes and helicopters."They say the most dangerous part of flying is the landings, so we just avoid that part," Harold said.

The family's military involvement dates back to 1963 when Harold joined the Army and was recruited by Special Forces while in basic training. He graduated from jump school in 1964 and served one tour in Vietnam. He left military service for 18 years, then a friend talked him into joining the Army Reserve.

The Logans are a military first. Harold knows of another family of paratroopers, but his is the first airborne all-in-the-family foursome where one of the members is female - his 21-year-old daughter, Dianne, a specialist.

Robert, 28, a sergeant, was the first of the Logan children to don a uniform with his dad. "We were in a mall or something and I said, `Dad, it's time we talked about something.' " Robert enlisted in December 1987.

Dianne later talked about the Guard with her father. He suggested she join and go to foreign language training. "I said `I want to do something else. I want to jump out of airplanes," she said.

James started applying while in high school and enlisted earlier this year.

"It only kind of surprised me when Robert went in. But when Dianne said she was doing it I was just flabbergasted," said Harold's wife, Paulette. She insists she never worries while watching her husband and children jump out of airplanes. The airborne-insignia earrings she wears indicate her support for the family's jumpy endeavor.

Harold and Paulette have two younger children. Their 18-year-old daughter, Sarah, wears camouflage clothing to school and has drawn the attention of recruiters. Their youngest son, Richard, is 14. Harold said it may be a little too early to tell what his interest is.

There are also three older Logan children. There is a good family turnout to watch the foursome jump, but talk of membership in the Guard sparks an interesting banter.

Daughter Sheila said joining the National Guard "never even crossed my mind." Her disinterest drew interesting responses from Dianne and Sarah.

"She's too much of a girl," Dianne said. "When you join the Army you have to be prepared to break a few nails, sweat, play in the dirt and sleep outside."

Sarah calls her oldest sister "the biggest weenie in the family."

"And I'm proud of it," Sheila responds.

James and Robert work together in construction and Dianne works full-time for the Guard at its state headquarters in Draper. All three share an apartment in Sandy, but their father commutes 10 hours each way for Guard duty from the family home in Springerville, Ariz., where he and his wife work as a team maintaining several LDS Church buildings.