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ENJOYMENT IS NO CHALLENGE AT SPIFFY 1-ACT PLAY

SHARE ENJOYMENT IS NO CHALLENGE AT SPIFFY 1-ACT PLAY

The Art Access Gallery means just what it says. Like the ramps and lifts that help people who need a leg up to gain "access" to public life, the gallery helps them gain access to the world of art.

And on Monday night the gallery was the site for a spiffy little one-act play written and directed by Lori Brock, a challenged young woman who works for United Cerebral Palsy of Utah. Mounted by the Second West Acting Company, the comedy features several strong roles for actors and artists who must focus a little more on mobility and communication. And though Robert Irons, who plays a cantankerous gallery owner, slyly calls it "a fun little piece of nonsense," the comedy actually treats problems of identity, insensitivity and manipulation in a very winning, offhand manner."The play grew out of an improvisation we did in a workshop," says Brock. "It took me about a week to put together a rough draft, then we went to work on it."

At heart, the plot spins around mistaken identity, where people you think are one type of person actually turn out to be another. And though it only runs for about 25 minutes, it manages to introduce us to a distracted receptionist (Fawn Garrett), a starving artist (Kenneth Robertson), a wigged-out hippie genius (Mark Smith) and a brassy building inspector (Natalie Anderson). Irons, as shifty "Mr. Dupray," cements the cast.

Shauna K. Brock serves as stage manager, sets are by John Cook's Artistic Services, Theater Works West provided sound effects and the Episcopal Diocese sponsored the effort.

Unhappily, Monday's show was the only scheduled performance, though Second West Acting Company works as a traveling company and would be happy to stage the show for other groups and organizations.

Phone Art Access/Very Special Arts at 328-0703 for information.