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ALL DAVIS CITIES BUT 1 PAY SHARE OF DRUG BATTLE

SHARE ALL DAVIS CITIES BUT 1 PAY SHARE OF DRUG BATTLE

The Davis Metro Narcotics Strike Force will get financial support this year from every city in the county except Clinton.

The small bedroom community west of Hill Air Force Base simply doesn't have $3,600 to give the countywide, drug-fighting program. "To us, that's money that directly pays an officer to patrol our city," said Chief Bill Chilson.Strike force officers complained earlier this year that Clinton and West Bountiful hadn't paid their annual shares of the budget for four years.

Soon after, officials from West Bountiful delivered a $2,000 check to the strike force's office. But Clinton still hasn't paid its share - and won't.

"I think we had one drug case here last year. That's a lot of money to pay . . . taxpayers wouldn't get much bang for their buck," Chilson said.

He also pointed to a "lack of communication" from strike force leaders, a complaint echoed by West Bountiful.

"The only time I heard from them is when they sent us the bill and annual report," Chilson said.

West Bountiful City Manager Wendell Wild said the City Council decided to give its allotment in good will.

"Yes, there hasn't been real good communication but we think that will improve. And the drug problem is countywide; maybe our contribution will help south Davis County."

The strike force was organized in 1983 and is only partially funded by annual payments or contributions from each of the county's 15 cities. The remainder of its $140,000 yearly budget comes form seizures and forfeitures.

Last year, for example, officers seized $450,000 worth of vehicles, of which $72,000 worth were forfeited. Nearly $46,000 in cash and weapons were seized from dealers, bringing the strike force's total haul to $115,00.

By law, the money goes directly to drug interdiction, office expenses and to pay agent wages.