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WHAT DO YOU GET WHEN YOU CROSS `QUINCY' WITH `INDIANA JONES'? TODD FENTON'S JOB

Todd Fenton has helped unravel murder mysteries, excavated bones of cannibal victims and boiled human remains.

But the latest assignment for the forensic anthropologist and graduate assistant at the Arizona Human Identification Laboratory in Tucson has brought him to the Idaho Museum of Natural History.Fenton is helping museum officials comply with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, which requires that bones of Indians be returned to their rightful tribe. Bones at the museum must be examined to determine if they should be returned to the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes.

"What we have are fragments of bones," said Sharon Holmer, museum anthropology collections manager. "We're not sure they're Native American."

Fenton, Holmer and anthropology graduate student Jared Cornelison will examine the size and shape of the bones for tentative identification by summer, then submit a report on their work to the tribes.

Many bones or fragments have been at the museum for decades, since before records were kept, Holmer said. Some might have been dug up when a farmer plowed a field or when roads were built.

Fenton also has helped find and identify bones of murder victims in Southwest deserts. And Fenton helped shed more light on an 1874 murder case in Colorado as part of a research team that excavated bones of five men allegedly killed and eaten by Alferd Packer.