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ERICKSON OFFERS NO EXCUSES FOR DUI ARREST

When Seattle Seahawks coach Dennis Erickson was arrested for drunken driving less than two weeks ago, his blood-alcohol level was twice the legal limit, officials said.

"It was a stupid thing to do," Erickson said at a news conference Tuesday. "I have no excuses."Erickson was stopped April 15 on Interstate 5 near Marysville, north of Seattle. If convicted on a first DUI offense, Erickson faces a mandatory 24-hour jail stay, a fine of between $350 and $1,000, and a license suspension of up to 90 days.

"It was an awful mistake. I regret it," Erickson said. "It's embarrassing. I apologize to the organization, to this community. It's been a tough learning process, and it'll never happen again.

"All I can do is apologize."

The arrest came four months after a car crash that left Seahawks lineman Mike Frier paralyzed from the waist down in what authorities say was an accident involving drinking.

Erickson was found to have a blood-alcohol level of .23, said Snohomish County deputy prosecutor James Townsend. A level of .10 is the legal threshold for intoxication in Washington state.

Arraignment was set for May 3.

The incident is "disappointing and embarrassing" for the team, Seahawks president David Behring said.

Erickson, 47, would not answer questions at the news conference, but said he had no similar incidents in his past. A Washington State Patrol spokesman said he knew of no other DUI citations in Washington for Erickson.

In the Dec. 1 crash, running backs Lamar Smith and Chris Warren were traveling with Frier in Smith's car when it struck a utility pole near the team's headquarters. Smith, who was driving, has been charged with vehicular assault. Prosecutors allege Smith was drunk and speeding.

Other alcohol-related problems involving the Seahawks include cornerback Orlando Watters, who was cited Dec. 13 for driving while intoxicated, possessing marijuana and carrying a concealed knife and former Seahawks defensive back Patrick Hunter, who pleaded guilty in January to his second drunken driving charge.