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THE WINNERS AND THE LOSERS

* WINNERS: Utah ski resorts. Though final figures are not in yet, the 1994-95 ski season in Utah seems bound to set records for patronage. For this accomplishment, Utahns can thank the heavy snowfalls in November and December, ongoing problems at the airport in neighboring competitor Denver, and the favorable publicity generated by Utah's bid for the 2002 Winter Olympics.

LOSERS: Nonsmokers. A new study shows they are more vulnerable than smokers to the cardiovascular damage caused by breathing fumes from someone else's cigarettes. Smokers, it seems, develop a certain tolerance for the toxins in second-hand tobacco smoke.* WINNERS: Nonsmokers. That's because habitual smokers still run the greatest risk of heart disease. They are two to three times more likely than nonsmokers to have heart attacks and strokes.

LOSERS: Women drinkers - and their babies. Despite growing awareness that liquor can lead to fetal alcohol syndrome, the government reports that a fifth of the women in the country continue to drink after learning they are pregnant. Clearly, a more aggressive education program is needed on the risk that babies of drinking mothers will be born with mental retardation, abnormal facial features, nerve problems, growth deficiencies or behavioral difficulties. Sadly, some women never learn.

LOSERS: Women cadets at the nation's military academies. Despite the 1991 Tailhook scandal and the ruined careers and stiffer penalties that resulted, the situation has only worsened. A new congressional study indicates the percentage of female students who have been harassed verbally or physically have increased slightly at West Point and significantly at the Naval and Air Force Academies. Sadly, some men never learn.

* WINNER?: Warsaw, Poland. This week the city formally opened its new subway system - only 70 years after the first hole was dug. The silver lining in this saga is that the long delay enabled the facility to be completed with the most modern transportation technology. Modern but modest, the new subway has 11 stops over 6.5 miles - making it one of the shortest systems in Europe.