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GOLF PROPOSALS ARE ON HOLD IN RICHFIELD AND FILLMORE

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Expansion of a nine-hole golf course to 18 holes has been temporarily put on the back burner in this city. And proposed construction of a new course in another south-central Utah community isn't dead but is lying somewhat dormant.

The Richfield City Council has concluded that expansion of the Cove View Course should not go forward until a swimming pool bond is paid off in 1997. Mayor Paul Lyman believes additional taxes would then not be needed to pay off another bond for the golf course.In Fillmore, it has been decided that the cost would be too high to build a nine-hole golf layout unless there would be participation by the county or it could be built by private enterprise. But there's still hope for a course through a private individual who may construct one and turn it over to the city, according to Mayor Keith Gillins.

The expansion at Richfield is still in the planning stages, and an architect has been studing design for a layout. In the meantime, city officials plan to explain the economic benefits of the golf course expansion to the city, and particularly to those who don't golf, said Councilman Chet Thompson.

The City Council recently adopted a resolution that authorizes up to $2 million for expansion of the golf course and upgrading the present nine-hole layout.

The expansion is estimated to cost $1.6 million, but it could climb to $2 million, according to the mayor. City officials want to sell that amount in bonds if the need arises, he said.

"It would be a general obligation bond and we want the people to have a say in it," Lyman said. "We think it has broad support."

Richfield officials authorized a feasibility study. It concludes that an 18-hole course would substantially increase play and that it would show a profit soon after expansion.

About 27,000 rounds annually are now recorded on the nine-hole course.

In Fillmore, Gillins said a private contractor is considering building a course and then turning it over to the city. "He has a course designer putting it together, and after that is done and costs are projected, we will get an answer.

"We would provide money for water and maintenance, but we can't provide the capital to build it. He holds the trump card."

Gillins said 55 acres of city property have been committed for a golf course. The cost to build one is estimated at about $1 million.

Fillmore is the only sizable community along I-15 from Idaho to California that doesn't have a golf course, it was concluded several months ago by Scott Drummond, who has encouraged building of a course.