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PROSECUTORS’ REBUTTAL KEEPS O.J. TRIAL HOPPING

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In their hurry-up rebuttal case, O.J. Simpson prosecutors showed that they believed Mark Fuhrman was beyond repair, Henry Lee wasn't beyond reproach and that when all else fails, bring back the glove man.

Prosecutors pared a list of 60 witnesses to 13, called over five days to keep things hopping so the weary, sequestered jury doesn't lose all interest and blame its plight on the district attorney's office.The jury hadn't seen this much testimony in a court week since the end of August, when Lee took the stand for the defense.

The prosecution's answer to a still-unfinished defense case is expected to wrap up Monday with the end of testimony from an FBI shoe print expert. He did what no other witness dared to do: challenge the internationally renowned Lee.

Apparently rattled by FBI agent William Bodziak's testimony, Lee called a news conference in his home state of Connecticut and took the unusual step of commenting on evidence and testimony during the trial. He could still be recalled for more testimony.

Legal analysts said Bodziak's statement that the defense, through Lee, mischaracterized murder-scene blood stains as a second set of shoe prints injected much-needed life into a prosecution case wilted by the defense attack on Fuhrman.

"It was just what the prosecution needed," said Southwestern University law professor Myrna Raeder. "This is a very strong ending for the rebuttal case, assuming that (defense attorney) Barry Scheck is not able to come back with anything that will dynamite Bodziak's testimony."

As for Fuhrman, skewered by his own racist words on tape, the prosecution didn't even try to rehabilitate him. Fuhrman was so badly discredited by the defense that some legal experts had anticipated a lengthy rebuttal to put space between the Fuhrman tapes and jury deliberations.

The prosecution decided against putting on any evidence of the notorious slow-speed chase with Simpson in his Ford Bronco. That included what the prosecution said was testimony about Simpson's personal attorney hauling away a bunch of cash from Simpson's safe-deposit box the day of the chase.

The prosecution did, however, bring back one familiar face. Glove expert Richard Rubin returned for his fourth stint and testified that gloves Simpson wore during football broadcasts were the same unique model as the evidence gloves.