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`MOST WANTED’ HOST SLAMS RULING THAT OPENED SON’S FILE

SHARE `MOST WANTED’ HOST SLAMS RULING THAT OPENED SON’S FILE

John Walsh, host of the popular television show "America's Most Wanted" and father of a 6-year-old murder victim, went on television Friday to criticize the decision that opened files of the murder case.

Broward Circuit Judge Leroy Moe rejected in Florida Thursday a last-minute plea by prosecutors and John and Reve Walsh to stop the release of the police files about the boy's highly publicized 1981 murder.In an appearance on "CBS This Morning" Walsh criticized the decision and criticized the judge for not letting his wife, "the mother of the victim," testify.

Some 10,000 pages of police investigative records about the abduction and murder of 6-year-old Adam Walsh are scheduled to be released Friday.

The child was abducted from a shopping center. His head was found, but his body was never found and no arrests have been made in the case.

Prosecutors pleaded that they need a few more months to charge someone and say leads point to two serial killers, Walsh told CBS. He expects the release to harm the 15-year-old investigation.

"Now, witnesses can be badgered by reporters," Walsh said. "Things known only to the killer will be made public."

The widely published photograph of the smiling little boy with a baseball cap became a national symbol for missing children after he was abducted almost 15 years ago from a suburban Fort Lauderdale shopping center as his mother shopped. Adam's head was found two weeks later in a Florida canal.

Judge Moe ruled that there was no sign of an "arrest or prosecution in the foreseeable future" in the case, and no reason to keep the documents secret.

Several newspapers went to court last October demanding that the police release its huge investigative file on the case. Judge Moe agreed with their request and set Feb. 16 as the date for the documents to be made public.

"People in South Florida want to know what happened, what did the investigation turn up over the years," said Martin Reeder, an attorney for the newspapers.

"The police have had their chance. . . . Now it's time to put it all before the public and see what happens."

The industry wants to sell newspapers, Walsh told CBS, saying that it was a big case. He said Thursday's hearing was not about his son.

"Adam's name was never mentioned," Walsh said.

Police detectives as recently as last week interviewed suspected serial killer Ottis Toole in connection with Adam's murder, the Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel reported.