Facebook Twitter

5 TO RECEIVE AWARDS FROM U. AT FOUNDER’S DAY FESTIVITIES

SHARE 5 TO RECEIVE AWARDS FROM U. AT FOUNDER’S DAY FESTIVITIES

Four alumni and one honorary alumnus will be honored at the University of Utah Founder's Day celebration.

Distinguished alumni awards will be presented to Elaine Moesser Burrows, Kay White Dumke, Robert G. Engman and L. Ralph Mecham. Robert H. Hinckley Jr. will receive the honorary alumnus award.The event will be held March 6 at the Marriott Hotel in downtown Salt Lake City.

Burrows, who was graduated with a bachelor's degree in 1956 and master's degree in 1981, is the director of guidance at Kearns High School. She has developed instructional videos, lectures and publications to help students and their parents understand the procedures for applying to college and obtaining financial aid.

The recipient of several teaching honors, Burrows applied the $10,000 she received with the Jon M. Huntsman Award for Excellence in Education toward a scholarship fund for Kearns High School students.

Dumke, a 1951 graduate, and her husband, Zeke, are considered the "parents" of Red Butte Garden and Arboretum. She was involved in the garden's funding, improvement and expansion.

A former director of W.R. White Pipe Co. and Western States Management Corp., Dumke also serves on the University Hospital Foundation Board and several other local foundations.

Engman, a 1953 U. graduate, worked as a design engineer and later started his own company, OPTO, which boasts $50 million in annual sales. He and his wife, Mary, have endowed a scholarship fund in electrical engineering and have made a commitment to donate equipment to modernize undergraduate teaching laboratories.

Mecham, who earned his undergraduate degree from the U. in 1951, a doctorate from Harvard and law degree from George Washington University, is the director of the administrative office of the federal court system. He served as an administrative assistant and counsel to the late Sen. Wallace F. Bennett. He was also a vice president at the U. and special assistant to the U.S. Secretary of Commerce.

Hinckley, a 1942 graduate of West Point, served on the first board of the Hinckley Institute of Politics, which was created by his father and the Edward John Noble Foundation with a $250,000 grant. The institute has grown from six interns to more than 3,000 since its inception in 1965, and the endowment is now $4 million. After serving in the military in World War II and the Korean War, Hinckley returned to the family automobile dealership.