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SHIVERING SERBS DEPEND ON NONE BUT THEIR HORSES

SHARE SHIVERING SERBS DEPEND ON NONE BUT THEIR HORSES

It was 5 degrees as the sun set on the hills above Sarajevo, but Mico Kubura had little choice: He curled up with his horses and spent the night in the open.

He shivered with cold, and cursed Bosnian Serb leaders. But Kubura was happy to be out of reach of the Muslims and Croats taking control of his home.The baby-face, 30-ish farmer is part of a freezing river of human misery: thousands of Serbs trickling through the snow and mud in the mountains around Sarajevo to escape government by their wartime enemies.

It took Kubura and his horse-drawn open cart five days to travel about 30 miles from the northwestern Sarajevo suburb of Ilijas over jammed mountain roads.

"I really don't know how I made it through the night," he said Monday as he arrived in this Bosnian Serb stronghold on the opposite side of the Bosnian capital. Exhausted refugees were looking for shelter.

Few Serbs are staying for the transfer of northwest districts around the capital to the Muslim-Croat federation, which will govern half of Bosnia under the Dayton peace agreement.

Although the treaty envisioned restoring Sarajevo as a peaceful, multi-ethnic city, many more Serbs were packing their possessions on Serb trucks and leaving Monday.

Kubura said his political leaders let him down, but his horses didn't.

"I can thank my two horses for my life," he said, sitting atop all of his worldly belongings, piled aboard the wagon. "I laid down on them, covered myself with blankets, and we exchanged heat. That's how we survived the nightmare."

He cursed Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, who resides in a villa in Pale, for "selling the Sarajevo Serbs out."

"Where is he now to see this misery?" Kubura asked. "Probably watching it on TV in a heated room!"