Monti J. Favero, 47, conceded he was a killer who murdered his best friend, and a 2nd District Court judge sentenced him to five years to life in prison Friday.

Favero got the maximum sentence possible in the death of Scott K. Holbrook, 47, a father of eight whom Favero shot to death on June 8, 1994. Favero pleaded guilty in November to first-degree felony murder."I am a murderer filled with guilt," Favero told Judge Michael Glasmann and Holbrook's family, who sought the maximum sentence. "Scott was my friend and I took his life in an inexcusable and brutal act that has devastated his loved ones."

Favero, a former partner with Holbrook in The Lawn Doctor, told psychologists he took a Glock 9mm handgun to kill Holbrook when voices told him Holbrook was going to kill him. He has been diagnosed as schizophrenic.

He confronted Holbrook at the company, and shot him 11 times before driving his car into the building and trying to run over Holbrook's body. Favero then went home, told his parents what he had done and went with them to turn himself in to police.

The two had been friends for 20 years, and had enjoyed fishing and camping together as well as their work. Holbrook kept Favero as an employee at The Lawn Doctor even after he bought him out as a partner.

Favero has been examined by eight psychologists and all but one found he suffers from schizophrenia and a persecution complex made worse by his use of alcohol and drugs.

Holbrook's widow, Johnell Holbrook, read letters from two of his young surviving children. "Dad was a lot of fun," read one. "He helped me brush my teeth. He read to me and fed me oatmeal every morning," the children wrote.

Johnell Holbrook told the judge that no sentence was enough punishment for Favero. "We've had 21 months of pain and the emptiness is still there in our hearts," she said.

She told Favero, "We are scared of you and don't ever want to run into you. You must spend the rest of your life in prison."

Steven Holbrook called his brother's death "a slaughter."

"You are a terrible, cruel animal. Experts have said you have a character flaw, but that does not absolve you of your crazy, bizarre actions. You must never return to society with normal people."

Holbrook's adult daughter, Paige Peterson, said, "Much has been made of the fact that you're a good Catholic. But good Catholics don't murder their best friends."

Defense attorney Brian Florence asked the judge to reduce the crime to a second-degree felony and sentence Favero to one to 15 years in prison. The judge rejected that motion.

Favero has been examined by eight psychologists and all but one reported he suffers from schizophrenia and a persecution complex made worse by his use of alcohol and drugs.

Favero has been in custody since the murder and has been at the state mental hospital in Provo for treatment since November.

The judge sent him back to the hospital for transfer to the prison. The Board of Pardons will determine whether he serves time in the mental health unit or the regular prison population.