Facebook Twitter

ONLINE CHESS WHIZZES NO MATCH FOR CHAMP

SHARE ONLINE CHESS WHIZZES NO MATCH FOR CHAMP

Hundreds of online chess brains tried to unite, but Russian world champion Anatoly Karpov made mincemeat of them in the first open chess game on the Internet.

Monday's match went 65 moves and took 41/2 hours, with Karpov playing black and consensus playing white. White moves came from suggestions sent in over the Internet, with the most frequently proposed move chosen by a computer.Internet users, who had seven minutes to propose an opening, chose the king's pawn (e2-e4). Karpov countered in two seconds with the Caro-Kann (c7-c6).

As many as 300 players submitted suggestions to the worldwide computer network for the moves. The game ended when white would have had to sacrifice its queen to avoid an immediate checkmate threat.

"It was a good game," Karpov said. "They were serious players."

Karpov played his side of the game in a dimly lit hall at the Hotel Intercontinental in the Finnish capital. The game was reproduced on a large white screen, computer monitors and boards arranged on tables for chess buffs who paid $6.60 to sit in the same room as Karpov.

At Karpov's request, organizers sped up the game by cutting the time limit for each move from 10 minutes to seven.