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Pleasant Grove mayor

What impact will RDAs in Pleasant Grove have on the town?

ED SANDERSON:

The RDA for Block 4, which includes the high-density housing, is a done deal. I'm pleased to have the tax increment we wanted out of it. My concern is with the fact that we'd have had the same growth without them just because of the size of the community. I believe they've pushed development through maybe sooner than we'd have seen otherwise.

GRANT LOADER:

I don't like RDAs. They are too much of a Gestapo kind of thing. I believe in free enterprise. A lot of older people are being pushed out (by the RDAs) when they want to stay in their homes. I believe an RDA benefits two: the city and the developer.

LLOYD ASH:

With the RDA on 700 South we got 100 percent of the tax increment. That will return between $7 million and $8 million in a 10-year period. For that, we should be extremely happy. The downtown RDA is designed to preserve the historic value of Main Street and the upcoming EDA on Sam White/Proctor Lane should bring in upscale businesses.

What concerns does growth create for the city?

ED SANDERSON:

Rapid growth is going to occur. It's inevitable. The additional resident growth creates a demand on services. It drains us, but how can we tell others not to come here? The General Plan is our look to the future and our saving grace. We've got to follow it.

GRANT LOADER:

It's like everywhere else, I think we can organize it but not stop it. I can't believe it, we've been out campaigning with 2,000 brochures and haven't made a dent.

LLOYD ASH:

It means a demand on all of our public resources. It increases the demand on our public safety department, our recreation programs, public works.

Do you feel Pleasant Grove City practices open enough government?

ED SANDERSON:

Basically, we formed the new Action party because we didn't feel Pleasant Grove people had an ear from government leaders. They do have an awful lot of executive sessions. I'd like to see that as an exception rather than the usual.

GRANT LOADER:

No. They need to go out to the people more. They've got to listen to everybody. They need to do more with the neighborhood committees. I just barely got a call from my neighborhood chairman over in Grove Creek and I'm in the Battlecreek neighborhood.

LLOYD ASH:

Yes, absolutely. I believe we're as open as a city can be. I've never denied anyone a chance to be heard. Of course, there's always a handful who will disagree. In 14 years, I've never failed to divide my time equally between my business and the city. I can honestly say the city's been No. 1 in a lot of cases.

How critical is it that Pleasant Grove have interstate-highway access?

ED SANDERSON:

I don't have the burning desire to get that although it's important for the future of Pleasant Grove. It will help with our commercial base. We were skipped the last time and I don't know why, but Pleasant Grove would be all right without it. I don't think it's going to make or break our community.

GRANT LOADER:

We should have had that access a long time ago. It's a matter of infighting from the city that's delayed it. Now with all the growth, we don't have what we need, which is a shame because we had it all decided at one time.

LLOYD ASH:

It is very critical to our future and because we've stayed right on it, it's moved up on the state's list by about 15 years. We campaigned to get the rest stops closed to make room and pushed for north Utah County in the destination planning. We campaigned for funds with the Utah Department of Transportation, pushed to be listed as a project funded with Centennial Road funds.

Should the city subsidize its neighbors in recreation programs?

ED SANDERSON:

I don't feel like it's our responsibility to subsidize Cedar Hills recreation but I hate to see any kids excluded. At this point, we're excluding kids when the adults should be working it out.

GRANT LOADER:

I think if a town wants to be a town they've got to stand on their own. It's too bad for the kids, but if Cedar Hills wants to be a city, go ahead and be a city.

LLOYD ASH:

We are only second in size to Provo with our recreation program. In the past, it's been a lot cheaper for Cedar Hills people than for our own residents. That's not right. But I don't like to see children left out. I don't think that's good.

Ash's question for Sanderson: Are you willing to devote the many hours necessary and can you carry on the many projects that are in progress?

ED SANDERSON:

I'll devote the time it takes. The (light-rail) project I'm involved in now will wane in terms of the time it requires of me. In any event, I carry a phone and a pager so I'm always available. As for the projects the city's committed to, obviously there'll be a learning curve, but I'm willing to spend the time to learn.

Ash's question for Loader: Are you willing to devote the many hours necessary and can you carry on the many projects that are in progress?

GRANT LOADER:

I've always given it 100 percent-plus. I've stayed up for weeks making the queen's float when I didn't know the first thing about making a float. I've worked graveyard shifts and then worked all day on the city floats. I think people know I've been devoted to the city. There's probably a lot of current projects I need to know more about but I'm not afraid of community service.

Sanderson's question for Ash: What are your plans to strengthen the neighborhoods and will you continue to work with the General Plan?

LLOYD ASH:

Every meeting we've held we've talked about, supported and encouraged the neighborhood committees. Ed Sanderson is the neighborhood advisory board chairman, is he asking me how he should be doing his job better? I support the General Plan as a timely plan as we can afford it. We have to make today's decisions based on what the city can afford to do. Certainly, it can always be our goal.

Loader's question for Sanderson: I don't have a question for Ed Sanderson. I think we're pretty well on the same line of thinking. I think he's earned his keep.

ED SANDERSON:

I agree, I've known Grant for a lot of years and he feels the same way I do. We need better communication. We're not communicating well and the answer is always, "well, we're doing all we're supposed to do legally." Maybe we need to do a little more than that.

Sanderson's question for Loader: What would you do to strengthen the neighborhoods and will you work with the General Plan?

GRANT LOADER:

I would see that the information gets out a little better. I've just recently been contacted by my neighborhood chairman, who isn't even in my area.

Loader's question for Ash: How would you open up the town and why haven't you answered a few of my letters about things?

LLOYD ASH:

I'm sorry you feel the town's been closed. The town has always been open to the people. I felt your letters were comments expressing a stand on an issue and not asking for a response.